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Acute Chorea with Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in Diabetic Uremia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2014

Jong-Ho Park
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine
Han-Joon Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang
Seong-Min Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Eunhye Geriatric Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

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Uremia is a syndrome of clinical and metabolic abnormalities, which develops in parallel with the deterioration of renal function. Uremic encephalopathy is one of many manifestations of acute or chronic renal failure. It is usually applied to patients with cortical involvement, such as confusion, seizure, tremor, myoclonus, or asterixis. Some cases of acute extrapyramidal movement disorders associated with bilateral basal ganglia lesions, especially parkinsonism have been reported in uremic patients. Here, we report a diabetic uremic patient who developed acute chorea associated with bilateral basal ganglia lesions.

Type
Peer Reviewed Letter
Copyright
Copyright © The Canadian Journal of Neurological 2007

References

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