Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Deficiencies in Concussion Education in Canadian Medical Schools

  • Matthew J. Burke (a1), Josie Chundamala (a1) and Charles H. Tator (a1)
Abstract
Background:

Recent reports raise concern that physician knowledge of the identification and management of concussion may be deficient. There is little information known about the adequacy of concussion education provided to physicians or medical students. The present study assesses the concussion curriculum offered at medical schools in Canada.

Methods:

We asked all 17 Canadian medical schools to complete a questionnaire on their concussion curriculum, including the following: year of medical school offered; format/setting; and estimated teaching hours. The responses were organized into three categories: (1) concussion-specific education; (2) head injury education incorporating a concussion component; and (3) no concussion education.

Results:

Replies were received from 14 (82%) of the 17 medical schools in Canada. Of the 14 responding schools, four (29%) provided concussion-specific education, six (43%) offered head injury education that incorporated a concussion component, and four (29%) reported no concussion teaching in their curriculum.

Conclusion:

We found deficiencies in the concussion education curriculum provided in the majority of Canadian medical schools. To address this issue, we recommend that all medical schools should, at a minimum, include a one-hour formal concussion-specific teaching session in an early year of their curriculum to be followed by clinical exposure to concussed patients in the later years of medical school. Future studies will be necessary to evaluate if these recommended curricular enhancements are effective in remedying the reported gaps in physicians' concussion knowledge and whether the improved curriculum translates into better care for patients suffering concussion.

RÉSUMÉ Contexte :

Des rapports récents soulèvent des inquiétudes au sujet de lacunes dans les connaissances des médecins concernant le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la commotion cérébrale. Il existe peu d'information à savoir si l'enseignement fait aux médecins et aux étudiants en médecine sur la commotion cérébrale est adéquat. Cette étude évalue le curriculum sur la commotion cérébrale offert dans les facultés de médecine au Canada.

Méthode :

Nous avons demandé aux 17 facultés de médecine canadiennes de compléter un questionnaire portant sur leur curriculum sur la commotion cérébrale, incluant celui de l'année suivante, le format/le cadre et le nombre d'heures d'enseignement. Les réponses ont été réparties en trois catégories : 1) enseignement portant spécifiquement sur la commotion cérébrale; 2) enseignement portant sur le traumatisme crânien incluant la commotion cérébrale et 3) aucun enseignement sur la commotion cérébrale.

Résultats :

Nous avons reçu des réponses de 14 des 17 facultés de médecine du Canada (82%). Quatre des 14 facultés de médecine qui ont répondu (29%) offraient un enseignement distinct sur la commotion cérébrale, 6 (43%) offraient l'enseignement sur la commotion cérébrale dans le cadre de l'enseignement sur le traumatisme crânien et 4 (29%) ont rapporté ne pas offrir d'enseignement sur la commotion cérébrale dans leur curriculum.

Conclusion :

Nous avons identifié des lacunes dans le curriculum concernant l'enseignement sur la commotion cérébrale offert dans la majorité des facultés de médecine au Canada. Pour résoudre ce problème, nous recommandons que toutes les facultés de médecine devraient à tout le moins inclure une session d'enseignement formel d'une heure portant spécifiquement sur la commotion cérébrale au début du curriculum suivi, dans les années subséquentes, d'expérience clinique auprès de patients ayant subi une commotion cérébrale. Si ces recommandations sont suivies, des études ultérieures portant sur leur efficacité à remédier aux lacunes rapportées dans les connaissances des médecins sur la commotion cérébrale et indiquant si un curriculum amélioré se traduit par de meilleurs soins offerts à ces patients devraient être effectuées.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Deficiencies in Concussion Education in Canadian Medical Schools
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Deficiencies in Concussion Education in Canadian Medical Schools
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Deficiencies in Concussion Education in Canadian Medical Schools
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
University of Toronto, ThinkFirst Canada Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St., Ste. 4W-433, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2S8, Email: charles.tator@uhn.ca
References
Hide All
1. Cusimano, M. Canadian minor hockey participants’ knowledge about concussion. Can J Neurol Sci. 2009;36(3):31520.
2. Guilmette, T, Malia, L, Mcguiggan, M. Concussion understanding and management among New England high school football coaches. Brain Inj. 2007;21(10):103947.
3. Covassin, T, Elbin, R, Stiller-Ostrowski, JL. Current sport-related concussion teaching and clinical practices of sports medicine professionals. J Athl Train. 2009;44(4):4004.
4. McCrory, P, Meeuwisse, W, Johnston, K, et al. Consensus statement on concussion in sport 3rd international conference on concussion in sport held in Zurich, November 2008. Clin J Sport Med. 2009;19:185200.
5. Colantonio, A, Saverino, C, Zagorski, B, et al. Hospitalizations and emergency department visits for TBI in Ontario. Can J Neurol Sci. 2010;37(6):78390.
6. Boggild, M, Tator, CH. Concussion knowledge among medical students and neurology/neurosurgery residents. Can J Neurol Sci. 2012;39(3):3618.
7. Demorest, RA, Bernhardt, DT, Best, TM, et al. Pediatric residency education: is sports medicine getting its fair share? Pediatrics. 2005;115:2833.
8. Provvidenza, CF, Johnston, KM. Knowledge transfer principles as applied to sport concussion education. Br J Sports Med. 2009;43 (Suppl I):i68i75.
9. Medical Council of Canada. Objectives for the qualifying examination, 3rd edition. [cited 2011 Dec 12] Available from: http://www.mcc.ca/Objectives_Online/objectives.pl?loc=home&lang=english
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences
  • ISSN: 0317-1671
  • EISSN: 2057-0155
  • URL: /core/journals/canadian-journal-of-neurological-sciences
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed