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Reversibility of MRI Features of Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome

  • J.A. Fraser (a1) (a2) and A.E. Leung (a3)
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

Western University, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, Rm. B7-104, 339 Windermere Rd., London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Email: alex.fraser@lhsc.on.ca.

References

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1.Chiu, AM, Cheunkongkaew, WL, Cornblath, WT, et al. Minocycline treatment and pseudotumor cerebri syndrome. Am J Ophthalmol. 1998;126:116–21.
2.Friedman, DI, Liu, GT, Digre, KB.Revised diagnostic criteria for the pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in adults and children. Neurology. 2013;81:1159–65.
3.Fraser, CL, Biousse, V, Newman, NJ.Minocycline-induced fulminant intracranial hypertension. Arch Neurol. 2012;69:1067–70.
4.Galvin, JA, Van Stavern, GP.Clinical characteristics of idiopathic intracranial hypertension at the Detroit Medical Center. J Neurol Sci. 2004;223:157–60.
5.Degnan, AJ, Levy, LM.Pseudotumor cerebri: brief review of clinical syndrome and imaging findings. Am J Neuroradiol. 2011;32:1986–93.
6.Brodsky, MC, Vaphiades, DO.Magnetic resonance imaging in pseudotumor cerebri. Ophthalmology. 1998;105:1686–93.
7.Bateman, GA, Stevens, SA, Stimpson, J.A mathematical model of idiopathic intracranial hypertension incorporating increased arterial inflow and variable venous outflow collapsibility. J Neurosurg. 2009;110:446–56.
8.Butros, SR, Goncalves, LF, Thompson, D, Agarwal, A, Lee, HK.Imaging features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, including a new finding: widening of the foramen ovale. Acta Radiologica. 2012;53:682–8.
9.Hoffman, J, Huppertz, HJ, Schmidt, C, et al. Morphometric and volumetric MRI changes in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Cephalalgia. 2013;33:1075–84.

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