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Transportation Use in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Association with Participation and Leisure Activities*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2010

Noémi Dahan-Oliel*
Affiliation:
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal
Barbara Mazer
Affiliation:
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal
Isabelle Gélinas
Affiliation:
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal
Bonnie Dobbs
Affiliation:
Rehabilitation Medicine and Department of Psychology, University of Alberta
Hélène Lefebvre
Affiliation:
Interdisciplinary Team for Family Research (ERIFAM), Faculty of Nursing, University of Montreal, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal
*
Correspondence and requests for offprints should be sent to / La correspondance et les demandes de tirés-à-part doivent être adressées à: Noémi Dahan-Oliel, M.Sc., B.Sc.(O.T.), Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Research Centre, 3205 Place Alton Goldbloom, Laval, Quebec H7V 1R2 (noemi.dahan@mail.mcgill.ca)

Abstract

This article presents a study that compared participation by elderly individuals living in the community according to primary transportation mode used, and estimated the association between transportation, personal factors, and environmental factors. Participants included 90 adults aged 65 and older (M = 76.3 years; SD = 7.7). They were classified according to their primary transportation mode: driver, passenger, public transport user, walk, or adapted transport/taxi user. Participation was measured with the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) and the Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire (NLQ). Overall, results indicated that drivers, public transport users, and walkers had higher participation levels compared to passengers and adapted transport/taxi users. This study suggests that clinicians should consider older adults’ use of transportation in an attempt to encourage and maximize their participation.

Résumé

Les objectifs de cette étude étaient de comparer la participation selon les moyens de transport utilisés, et d’estimer l’association entre le transport, les facteurs personnels et environnementaux avec la participation chez les personnes âgées habitant dans la communauté. Les participants incluaient 90 adultes âgés de 65 ans et plus (moyenne d’âge = 76.3 ans ; ET = 7.7). Ils étaient classifiés selon le moyen de transport utilisé le plus souvent: conducteur, passager, transport en commun, marche, ou transport adapté/taxi. La participation a été mesuré avec le « Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) » et le « Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire (NLQ) ». Somme toute, les résultats ont indiqué que les conducteurs, utilisateurs de transport en commun et ceux qui utilisaient la marche avaient des niveaux de participation plus élevés comparativement aux passagers et utilisateurs de transport adapté/taxi. Cette étude suggère que les cliniciens devraient considérer l’utilisation du transport chez les personnes âgées afin d’encourager et de maximiser leur participation.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 2010

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Footnotes

*

Special thanks to Gevorg Chilingaryan for statistical assistance and to Vira Rose for preparaion of recruitment materials. Much appreciation is given to the participants and recruiting medical clinics and particularly to Martine Labelle, Nicole Brazeau, and Dr. I. Kupferszmidt. Noémi Dahan-Oliel received a Masters Fellowship from the Canadian Driving Research Initiative for Vehicular Safety in the Elderly (Candrive).

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