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Habsburg Studies within Central European History: The State of the Field

  • John Deak (a1)
Extract

Habsburg studies stand at a crossroads. We have come a long way since C. A. Macartney published his magisterial history, The Habsburg Empire, in 1968. He began his story with the death of Joseph II in 1790—and thus, for him and his narrative, with the beginning of the end of the monarchy. Macartney's narrative represented the best and most complete traditional story of decline and fall, according to which the ever-present push of modernity put the Habsburg Monarchy in the larger story of modern Europe as an entity doomed to dissolution. Moreover, its leaders, embodied in the clever Prince Clemens von Metternich, foresaw the decline of the empire and did their best to resist change and forestall the future.

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References
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1 Macartney, C. A., The Habsburg Empire, 1790–1918 (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1968).

2 Namier, Lewis B., “The Downfall of the Habsburg Monarchy,” in A History of the Paris Peace Conference, ed. Temperley, Harold W. V., vol. 4 (London: Henry Frowde and Hodder & Stoughton, 1921), 58119.

3 Rudolph, Richard L., Banking and Industrialization in Austria-Hungary: The Role of Banks in the Industrialization of the Czech Crownlands, 1873–1914 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976); Komlos, John, The Habsburg Monarchy as a Customs Union: Economic Development in Austria-Hungary in the Nineteenth Century (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1983); Good, David F., The Economic Rise of the Habsburg Empire, 1750–1914 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984).

4 Jászi, Oscar, The Dissolution of the Habsburg Monarchy (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1929).

5 Cohen, Gary B., The Politics of Ethnic Survival: Germans in Prague, 1861–1914, 2nd ed. (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2006).

6 Anderson, Benedict, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, rev. ed. (London: Verso, 2016).

7 Zahra, Tara, “Reclaiming Children for the Nation: Germanization, National Ascription, and Democracy in the Bohemian Lands, 1900–1945,” Central European History (CEH) 37, no. 4 (2004): 501–43; idem, Kidnapped Souls: National Indifference and the Battle for Children in the Bohemian Lands, 1900–1948 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008).

8 Burbank, Jane and Cooper, Frederick, Empires in World History: Power and the Politics of Difference (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010), 23.

9 Judson, Pieter M., The Habsburg Empire: A New History (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016); also see An Imperial Dynamo? CEH Forum on Pieter Judson's The Habsburg Empire: A New History,” CEH 50, no. 2 (2017): 236–59.

10 Klabjan, Borut, “‘Scramble for Adria’: Discourses of Appropriation of the Adriatic Space Before and After World War I,” Austrian History Yearbook 42 (April 2011): 1632; Pergher, Roberta, Mussolini's Nation-Empire: Sovereignty and Settlement in Italy's Borderlands, 1922–1943 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017).

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Central European History
  • ISSN: 0008-9389
  • EISSN: 1569-1616
  • URL: /core/journals/central-european-history
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