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Age and the Cost of Being Uyghurs in Ürümchi

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 May 2012

Xiaowei Zang
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield. E-mail: X.Zang@sheffield.ac.uk

Abstract

This article asks: is the cost of being Uyghurs higher for young Uyghurs than for old Uyghurs in Ürümchi? I address this question with data from a survey of 2,947 people conducted in Ürümchi in 2005. The cost of being Uyghurs refers to the extent of economic inequality in the earnings of Han Chinese and Uyghurs. I develop three hypotheses on the effect of age on earnings differentials between Han Chinese and Uyghurs. Data analyses show that although young Uyghurs are better educated and earn more than old Uyghurs, they are more likely than old Uyghurs to suffer from being Uyghurs in Ürümchi. This finding has policy implications for the reduction of ethnic disparity in Xinjiang.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The China Quarterly 2012

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References

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14 Toops, “The demography of Xinjiang,” p. 262.

15 Mackerras, “Xinjiang at the turn of the century,” p. 299.

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22 Becquelin, “Xinjiang in the nineties,” p. 85; Mackerras, “Xinjiang at the turn of the century,” p. 299; Maurer-Fazio, Margaret, Hughes, James and Zhang, Dandan, “An ocean formed from one hundred rivers,” Feminist Economics, Vol. 13, No. 3–4 (2007), p. 181CrossRefGoogle Scholar; Yee, “Ethnic relations in Xinjiang,” p. 449.

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24 Toops, “The demography of Xinjiang,” p. 257.

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28 Bian, Work and Inequality, pp. 168–69.

29 Smith, “Four generations,” p. 195.

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