Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-wr4x4 Total loading time: 0.286 Render date: 2023-01-29T16:22:47.533Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Attitudes Toward Borderline Personality Disorder: A Survey of 706 Mental Health Clinicians

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2011

Abstract

Objective

We sought to determine attitudes toward patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) among mental health clinicians at nine academic centers in the United States.

Methods

A self-report questionnaire was distributed to 706 mental health clinicians, including psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, social workers, nurses, and psychologists.

Results

The study showed that most clinicians consider BPD a valid diagnosis, although nearly half reported that they preferred to avoid these patients. The clinician's occupational subgroup was significantly related to attitude. Staff nurses had the lowest self-ratings on overall caring attitudes, while social workers had the highest. Social workers and psychiatrists had the highest ratings on treatment optimism. Social workers and psychologists were most optimistic about psychotherapy effectiveness, while psychiatrists were most optimistic about medication effectiveness. Staff nurses had the lowest self-ratings on empathy toward patients with BPD and treatment optimism.

Discussion

Negative attitudes persist among clinicians toward BPD, but differ among occupational subgroups. Overall, caring attitudes, empathy, and treatment optimism were all higher among care providers who had cared for a greater number of BPD patients in the past 12 months.

Conclusion

These findings hold important implications for clinician education and coordination of care for patients with BPD.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Faculty Disclosures: Dr. Black has received research support from AstraZeneca and Psyadon. Dr. Blum receives royalties from sales of STEPPS CD-ROMs. Ms. Blum receives royalties from Level One Publishing-DBA Blum's Books. Dr. North is a consultant to the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center; is a consultant to Tarrant County, Texas; and has received research support from the NIAAA, the Veterans Administration, the American Psychiatric Association, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. Dr. Phillips has received salary and grant funding from the NIMH; has received research support from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the FDA, Forest Pharmaceuticals, and Transcrepts; recieves royalties from Oxford University Press; and can potentiallt recieve future royalties from the Free Press and Guilford Press. Dr. Silk's son receives a salary as an employee at Pfizer. Dr. Pfohl, Mr. McCormick, Dr. Allen, Dr. Robins, Dr. Siever, Dr. Williams, and Dr. Zimmeran report no affiliation with or financial interest in any organization that might pose a conflict of interest.

Acknowledgements: The authors wish to acknowledge the efforts of the following individuals in data collection: John Gunderson, MD, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, and A. John Rush, MD, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas. We are grateful to Jo Ann Franklin and Rebecca Hansel for data collection and entry at the University of Iowa, Iowa.

References

Faculty Disclosures: Dr. Black has received research support from AstraZeneca and Psyadon. Dr. Blum receives royalties from sales of STEPPS CD-ROMs. Ms. Blum receives royalties from Level One Publishing-DBA Blum's Books. Dr. North is a consultant to the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center; is a consultant to Tarrant County, Texas; and has received research support from the NIAAA, the Veterans Administration, the American Psychiatric Association, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. Dr. Phillips has received salary and grant funding from the NIMH; has received research support from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the FDA, Forest Pharmaceuticals, and Transcrepts; recieves royalties from Oxford University Press; and can potentiallt recieve future royalties from the Free Press and Guilford Press. Dr. Silk's son receives a salary as an employee at Pfizer. Dr. Pfohl, Mr. McCormick, Dr. Allen, Dr. Robins, Dr. Siever, Dr. Williams, and Dr. Zimmeran report no affiliation with or financial interest in any organization that might pose a conflict of interest.

Acknowledgements: The authors wish to acknowledge the efforts of the following individuals in data collection: John Gunderson, MD, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA, and A. John Rush, MD, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas. We are grateful to Jo Ann Franklin and Rebecca Hansel for data collection and entry at the University of Iowa, Iowa.

50
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Attitudes Toward Borderline Personality Disorder: A Survey of 706 Mental Health Clinicians
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Attitudes Toward Borderline Personality Disorder: A Survey of 706 Mental Health Clinicians
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Attitudes Toward Borderline Personality Disorder: A Survey of 706 Mental Health Clinicians
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *