Hostname: page-component-594f858ff7-x2rdm Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-06-10T15:44:11.700Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "corePageComponentUseShareaholicInsteadOfAddThis": true, "coreDisableSocialShare": false, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

Pediatric Practice Readiness for Disaster Response

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2020

Scott Needle
Affiliation:
Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida
Andrew C. Rucks
Affiliation:
Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Lauren A. Wallace*
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Peter M. Ginter
Affiliation:
Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Charles R. Katholi
Affiliation:
Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Rongbing Xie
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to Lauren A. Wallace, DrPH, Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, CHHS 427D, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC28223-0001 (e-mail: lauren.wallace@uncc.edu).

Abstract

Objectives:

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) calls for the inclusion of office-based pediatricians in disaster preparedness and response efforts. However, there is little research about disaster preparedness and response on the part of pediatric practices. This study describes the readiness of pediatric practices to respond to disaster and delineates factors associated with increased preparedness.

Methods:

An AAP survey was distributed to members to assess the state of pediatric offices in readiness for disaster. Potential predictor variables used in chi-square analysis included community setting, primary employment setting, area of practice, and previous disaster experience.

Results:

Three-quarters (74%) of respondents reported some degree of disaster preparedness (measured by 6 indicators including written plans and maintaining stocks of supplies), and approximately half (54%) reported response experience (measured by 3 indicators, including volunteering to serve in disaster areas). Respondents who reported disaster preparation efforts were more likely to have signed up for disaster response efforts, and vice versa.

Conclusions:

These results contribute information about the state of pediatric physician offices and can aid in developing strategies for augmenting the inclusion of office-based pediatricians in community preparedness and response efforts.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc.

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

American Academy of Pediatrics Disaster Preparedness Advisory Council, Committee on Pediatric Emergency Medicine. Ensuring the health of children in disasters. Pediatrics. 2015;136(5):e14071417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Russell, K, Oliver, SE, Lewis, L, et al. Update: Interim guidance for the evaluation and management of infants with possible congenital zika virus infection - United States, August 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016;65:870878.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jhung, MA, Shehab, N, Rohr-Allegrini, C, et al. Chronic disease and disasters: medication demands of Hurricane Katrina evacuees. Am J Prev Med. 2007;33(3):207210.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Center for Health Statistics. Summary Health Statistic: National Health Interview Survey, Table C-7. Usual place of health care, and type of place, for children under age 18 years, by selected characteristics: United States, 2015. https://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2015_SHS_Table_C-7.pdf. Accessed May 10, 2017.Google Scholar
Hing, E, Burt, C. Characteristics of office-based physicians and their medical practices: United States, 2005-2006: National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 13 2008;(166):134Google Scholar
Needle, S. Office readiness, personal preparedness, and the role of the medical home in community resiliency. Clin Pediatr Emerg Med. 2014;15(4):289295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bothe, DA, Olness, KN, Reyes, C. Overview of children and disasters. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2018;39(8):652662.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schonfeld, DJ, Demaria, T. Providing psychosocial support to children and families in the aftermath of disasters and crises. Pediatrics. 2015;136(4):e1120e1130.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Adams, RE, Laraque, D, Chemtob, CM, et al. Does a one-day educational training session influence primary care pediatricians’ mental health practice procedures in response to a community disaster? Results from the reaching children initiative (RCI). Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2013;15(1):314.Google Scholar