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Engaging Active Bystanders in Mass Casualty Events and Other Life-Threatening Emergencies: A Pilot Training Course Demonstration

  • Tracey O. Smith (a1), Susan D. Baker (a2), Kathryn Roberts (a3) and Skip A. Payne (a1)
Abstract

Emerging research indicates the critical role members of the public can play in saving lives and reducing morbidity at the scene in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. It is anticipated that with training, more members of the public will be ready and able to assist should they be present at mass casualty events or other circumstances in which there are serious injuries or potential loss of life. This article describes a training course developed by multiple federal and nonfederal partners aimed at preparing the public to become “active bystanders” followed by a pilot demonstration project conducted by Medical Reserve Corps Units. The outcomes of the project indicated that the training was comprehensive and appropriate for members of the public with little or no first aid knowledge. National availability of the “Becoming an Active Bystander” training course is currently being planned. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:286–292).

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence and reprint requests to Tracey O. Smith, Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Division of the Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps, Washington, DC (e-mail: tsmith@hrsa.gov).
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Mr Payne is a Lieutenant Commander, Health Service Officer, in the US Public Health Service.

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References
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Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
  • ISSN: 1935-7893
  • EISSN: 1938-744X
  • URL: /core/journals/disaster-medicine-and-public-health-preparedness
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