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To Do a Work that Would Be Very Far Reaching: Minnie Geddings Cox, the Mississippi Life Insurance Company, and the Challenges of Black Women’s Business Leadership in the Early Twentieth-Century United States

  • SHENNETTE GARRETT-SCOTT (a1)
Abstract

In early December 1923 in Memphis, Tennessee, Minnie Geddings Cox sat in a hastily arranged board meeting across from Heman Perry, clear now that the man she had believed her advocate was most assuredly her adversary. Cox and Perry, a man Forbes magazine would describe in 1924 as the richest Negro in the world, spent nearly a year maneuvering a merger to join her company, Mississippi Life Insurance Company, the third largest black-owned life insurance company in the United States, with his Standard Life of Atlanta, which ranked second. 1 They shared a vision to create the largest black-owned life insurance company in the United States—or so Cox thought.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Elizabeth Gritter . River of Hope: Black Politics and the Memphis Freedom Movement, 1865–1954. Louisville: University Press of Kentucky, 2014.

Stephanie J Shaw . What a Woman Ought to Be and Do: African American Professional Women Workers During the Jim Crow Era. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.

Kristen Crossney and David Bartelt . “Residential Security, Risk, and Race: The Home Owners’ Loan Corporation and Mortgage Access in Two Cities.” Urban Geography 26, no. 8 (2005): 707736.

Vincent P De Santis . “The Republican Party and the Southern Negro, 1877–1897.” Journal of Negro History 45, No. 2 (April 1960): 7187.

Willard B Gatewood . “Theodore Roosevelt and the Indianola Affair.” Journal of Negro History 53, No. 1 (January 1968): 4850.

Neil R McMillen . “Perry W. Howard, Boss of Black-and-Tan Republicanism in Mississippi, 1924–1960.” Journal of Southern History 48, No. 2 (May 1982): 205224.

George E Mowry . “The South and the Progressive Lily White Party of 1912.” Journal of Southern History 6, No. 2 (May 1940): 237247.

Seth M Scheiner . “President Theodore Roosevelt and the Negro, 1901–1908.” The Journal of Negro History 47, No. 3 (July 1962): 169182.

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Enterprise & Society
  • ISSN: 1467-2227
  • EISSN: 1467-2235
  • URL: /core/journals/enterprise-and-society
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