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Payments for environmental services and rural livelihood strategies in Ecuador and Guatemala

  • DOUGLAS SOUTHGATE (a1), TIMOTHY HAAB (a2), JOHN LUNDINE (a3) and FABIÁN RODRÍGUEZ (a4)
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Presented in this paper are the results of two contingent valuation analyses, one undertaken in Ecuador and the other in Guatemala, of potential payments for environmental services (PES) directed toward rural households. We find that minimum compensation demanded by these households is far from uniform, depending in particular on individual strategies for raising incomes and dealing with risks. Our findings strengthen the case for allowing conservation payments to vary among recipients, which would be a departure from the current norm for PES initiatives in Latin America.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

P.J. Ferraro (2001), ‘Global habitat protection: limitations of development interventions and a role for conservation performance payments’, Conservation Biology 15: 9901000.

G.S. Fields (1975), ‘Rural-urban migration, urban unemployment and under-employment, and job search activity in LDCs’, Journal of Development Economics 2: 165188.

H. Markowitz (1952), ‘Portfolio selection’, Journal of Finance 7: 7791.

S. Pagiola (2008), ‘Payments for environmental services in Costa Rica’, Ecological Economics 65: 712724.

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Environment and Development Economics
  • ISSN: 1355-770X
  • EISSN: 1469-4395
  • URL: /core/journals/environment-and-development-economics
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