Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 13
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Negi, Chandra S. Joshi, Paras and Bohra, Sachin 2015. Rapid Vulnerability Assessment ofYartsa Gunbu(Ophiocordyceps sinensis[Berk.] G.H. Sung et al) in Pithoragarh District, Uttarakhand State, India. Mountain Research and Development, Vol. 35, Issue. 4, p. 382.


    Steele, Melita Z. Shackleton, Charlie M. Uma Shaanker, R. Ganeshaiah, K.N. and Radloff, Sarah 2015. The influence of livelihood dependency, local ecological knowledge and market proximity on the ecological impacts of harvesting non-timber forest products. Forest Policy and Economics, Vol. 50, p. 285.


    Olushola Arowolo, Aisha Agbonlahor, Mure Okuneye, Peter and Soaga, Jubril 2014. Assessing the distributional impact of community forest income. International Journal of Social Economics, Vol. 41, Issue. 11, p. 1101.


    Avocèvou-Ayisso, Carolle Sinsin, Brice Adégbidi, Anselme Dossou, Gatien and Van Damme, Patrick 2009. Sustainable use of non-timber forest products: Impact of fruit harvesting on Pentadesma butyracea regeneration and financial analysis of its products trade in Benin. Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 257, Issue. 9, p. 1930.


    MAKHADO, RUDZANI A. VON MALTITZ, GRAHAM P. POTGIETER, MARTIN J. and WESSELS, DIRK C.J. 2009. CONTRIBUTION OF WOODLAND PRODUCTS TO RURAL LIVELIHOODS IN THE NORTHEAST OF LIMPOPO PROVINCE, SOUTH AFRICA. South African Geographical Journal, Vol. 91, Issue. 1, p. 46.


    Shackleton, Charlie M. Parkin, Fiona Chauke, Maphambe I. Downsborough, Linda Olsen, Ashleigh Brill, Gregg and Weideman, Craig 2009. Conservation, commercialisation and confusion: harvesting of Ischyrolepis in a coastal forest, South Africa. Environment, Development and Sustainability, Vol. 11, Issue. 2, p. 229.


    Shackleton, Charlie M. Shackleton, Sheona E. Buiten, Erik and Bird, Neil 2007. The importance of dry woodlands and forests in rural livelihoods and poverty alleviation in South Africa. Forest Policy and Economics, Vol. 9, Issue. 5, p. 558.


    Costello, Christopher and Ward, Michael 2006. Search, bioprospecting and biodiversity conservation. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Vol. 52, Issue. 3, p. 615.


    Pote, J. Shackleton, C. Cocks, M. and Lubke, R. 2006. Fuelwood harvesting and selection in Valley Thicket, South Africa. Journal of Arid Environments, Vol. 67, Issue. 2, p. 270.


    SOLA, PHOSISO EDWARDS-JONES, GARETH and GAMBIZA, JAMES 2006. IMPACTS OF LEAF HARVESTING AND SAP TAPPING ON THE IVORY PALM (HYPHAENE PETERSIANA) IN SOUTH EASTERN ZIMBABWE. Forests, Trees and Livelihoods, Vol. 16, Issue. 4, p. 381.


    Emanuel, P.L. Shackleton, C.M. and Baxter, J.S. 2005. Modelling the sustainable harvest of Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra fruits in the South African lowveld. Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 214, Issue. 1-3, p. 91.


    Ticktin, T. 2004. The ecological implications of harvesting non-timber forest products. Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 41, Issue. 1, p. 11.


    Tabuti, J.R.S Lye, K.A and Dhillion, S.S 2003. Traditional herbal drugs of Bulamogi, Uganda: plants, use and administration. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Vol. 88, Issue. 1, p. 19.


    ×

Re-examining local and market-orientated use of wild species for the conservation of biodiversity

  • Charlie M. Shackleton (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0376892901000285
  • Published online: 01 May 2002
Abstract

The hypothesis of attaching and realising market values as one means of conserving biodiversity has gained ground over the last decade. This has been challenged recently after examination of a number of case studies, largely from tropical Amazonia, on high value logging, marketing of non-timber forest products, and bioprospecting. The conclusion was that market-orientated conservation has seldom generated the financial returns envisaged, and as such cannot be used as an incentive to prevent land transformation. This paper reviews the basis of the challenge to market-orientated conservation on a number of grounds, drawing on examples largely from southern Africa. It concludes that generalizations from tropical Amazonia regarding the failure of market-orientated conservation are probably premature, and that it should remain an option, amongst a number of options, for conservation of biodiversity. Additionally, the prerequisite criteria identified as necessary to create an enabling framework for the success of market-orientated conservation are insufficient. Case studies are presented where the prerequisites do not apply, yet current extraction for market purposes is sustainable. Other potential prerequisites are also considered. There is a need for multivariate analysis, based on a large sample size drawn from across a range of environments and resources, of which factors are important prerequisites for successful market-orientated conservation, and under which circumstances.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Dr Charlie M. Shackleton Tel: +27 46 603 8615 Fax: +27 46 622 5524 e-mail: c.shackleton@ru.ac.za
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Environmental Conservation
  • ISSN: 0376-8929
  • EISSN: 1469-4387
  • URL: /core/journals/environmental-conservation
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: