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    Bless, Philipp Justus Schmutz, Claudia Suter, Kathrin Jost, Marianne Hattendorf, Jan Mäusezahl-Feuz, Mirjam and Mäusezahl, Daniel 2014. A tradition and an epidemic: determinants of the campylobacteriosis winter peak in Switzerland. European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 29, Issue. 7, p. 527.


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Burden of illness and factors associated with duration of illness in clinical campylobacteriosis

  • A. E. DECKERT (a1) (a2), R. J. REID-SMITH (a1) (a2), S. TAMBLYN (a3), L. MORRELL (a4), P. SELISKE (a5), F. B. JAMIESON (a6), R. IRWIN (a2), C. E. DEWEY (a1), P. BOERLIN (a7) and S. A. McEWEN (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268813000332
  • Published online: 08 March 2013
Abstract
SUMMARY

A population-based study investigated the burden of illness, including the duration of illness associated with laboratory-confirmed cases of campylobacteriosis in two health unit areas. Questionnaire data were collected for 250 cases. The median duration of illness was 8 days and 66% of cases reported symptoms of moderate severity or greater. A Cox proportional hazards model identified antimicrobial use factors associated with a significantly increased rate of symptom resolution (shorter duration of illness): macrolides for less than the recommended number of days, ciprofloxacin for at least 3 days, and antimicrobials not recommended for campylobacteriosis. The impact of antimicrobial use was consistent regardless of when, during the course of illness, the antimicrobial use began. The effectiveness of ciprofloxacin in these results may be due to the low prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin in isolates from this study. The effect of antimicrobials not recommended for campylobacteriosis should be further investigated.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: A. E. Deckert, 160 Research Lane, Suite 103, Guelph, Ontario, CanadaN1 G 5B2. (Email: adeckert@uoguelph.ca)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
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