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Construction of syndromic surveillance using a web-based daily questionnaire for health and its application at the G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit meeting

  • H. SUGIURA (a1), Y. OHKUSA (a2), M. AKAHANE (a1), T. SUGAHARA (a2), N. OKABE (a2) and T. IMAMURA (a1)...
Summary
SUMMARY

We constructed a syndromic surveillance system to collect directly information on daily health conditions directly from local residents via the internet [web-based daily questionnaire for health surveillance system (WDQH SS)]. This paper considers the feasibility of the WDQH SS and its ability to detect epidemics. A verification study revealed that our system was an effective surveillance system. We then applied an improved WDQH SS as a measure against public health concerns at the G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit meeting in 2008. While in operation at the Summit, our system reported a fever alert that was consistent with a herpangina epidemic. The highly mobile WDQH SS described in this study has three main advantages: the earlier detection of epidemics, compared to other surveillance systems; the ability to collect data even on weekends and holidays; and a rapid system set-up that can be completed within 3 days.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: H. Sugiura, M.D., Department of Public Health, Health Management and Policy, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521, Japan. (Email: tomomarie@smn.enjoy.ne.jp)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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