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Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008

  • N. SREENIVASAN (a1) (a2), S. A. GOTESTRAND (a1), S. OMBEKI (a3), G. OLUOCH (a3), T. K. FISCHER (a4) (a5) and R. QUICK (a6)...
Summary

Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years.

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Corresponding author
* Author for correspondence: Dr N. Sreenivasan, Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd. MS A-38, Atlanta, GA, USA 30333. (Email: vii2@cdc.gov)
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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