Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-zm8ws Total loading time: 0.192 Render date: 2021-06-14T06:16:48.516Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

The method of transmission of epidemic influenza: further evidence from archival mortality data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

R. E. Hope-Simpson
Affiliation:
Epidemiological Research Unit, 86, Dyer Street, Cirenceester, Gloucestershire
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Summary

Evidence for influenza-associated excess mortality in the three centuries before the 20th has been sought from parish burial registers in Cumbria, Devon, Dyfed, East Anglia, Gloucestershire and Northumbria, compared with inter-epidemic years. Most of the registers showed excess of burials concordant with eight historic influenza epidemics.

Comparison of the dates of these epidemics, deduced from the burials data in different areas, showed a rate of spread difficult to reconcile with direct personto-person spread of influenza from the sick. An alternative explanation based on development of latency of the virus in the sick person and subsequent seasonal reactivation is discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

References

Alling, D. W., Blackwelder, W. C. & Stuart-Harris, C. H. (1981). A study of excess mortality during influenza epidemics in the United States, 1968–1976. American Journal of Epidemiology 113, 3043.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hirsch, A. (1883). Handbook of Geographical and Historical Pathology, translated from the second German edition by Creighton, C., vol. 1, p. 16. London: The New Sydenham Society.Google Scholar
Hope-Simpson, R. E. (1951). Influenza 1951. Discussion. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine 44, 789800.Google Scholar
Hope-Simpson, R. E. (1979). Epidemic mechanisms of type A influenza. Journal of Hygiene 83, 1126.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hope-Simpson, R. E. (1981). The role of season in epidemic influenza. Journal of Hygiene 86, 3547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hope-Simpson, R. E. (1983). Recognition of historic influenza epidemics from parish burial records: a test of prediction from a new hypothesis of influenzal epidemiology. Journal of Hygiene 91, 293308.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Massey, A. (1951). Influenza 1951: Discussion. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine 44, 790792.Google Scholar
Thatcher, A. R. (1981). Trends in respiratory mortality. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Thompson, T. (1852). Annals of Influenza from 1510–1837. London: The Sydenham Society.Google Scholar
You have Access
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The method of transmission of epidemic influenza: further evidence from archival mortality data
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The method of transmission of epidemic influenza: further evidence from archival mortality data
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The method of transmission of epidemic influenza: further evidence from archival mortality data
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *