Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Modelling alternative strategies for delivering hepatitis B vaccine in prisons: the impact on the vaccination coverage of the injecting drug user population

  • A. J. SUTTON (a1) (a2), N. J. GAY (a1), W. J. EDMUNDS (a1) and O. N. GILL (a3)
Summary

Since 2001 hepatitis B vaccination has been offered to prisoners on reception into prisons in England and Wales. However, short campaigns of vaccinating the entire population of individual prisons have achieved high vaccination coverage for limited periods, suggesting that short campaigns may be a preferable way of vaccinating prisoners. A model is used that describes the flow of prisoners through prisons stratified by injecting status to compare a range of vaccination scenarios that describe vaccination on prison reception or via regular short campaigns. Model results suggest that vaccinating on prison reception can capture a greater proportion of the injecting drug user (IDU) population than the comparable campaign scenarios (63% vs. 55·6% respectively). Vaccination on prison reception is also more efficient at capturing IDUs for vaccination than vaccination via a campaign, although vaccination via campaigns may have a role with some infections for overall control.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Modelling alternative strategies for delivering hepatitis B vaccine in prisons: the impact on the vaccination coverage of the injecting drug user population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Modelling alternative strategies for delivering hepatitis B vaccine in prisons: the impact on the vaccination coverage of the injecting drug user population
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Modelling alternative strategies for delivering hepatitis B vaccine in prisons: the impact on the vaccination coverage of the injecting drug user population
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Dr A. J. Sutton, Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. (Email: Andrew.Sutton@warwick.ac.uk)
References
Hide All
1. Health Protection Agency, Health Protection Scotland, National Public Health Service for Wales, CDSC Northern Ireland, CRDHB, and UASSG. Shooting up; infections among injecting drug users in the United Kingdom 2004: an update, October 2005. London: Health Protection Agency, 2005.
2. Health Protection Agency (www.hpa.org.uk). Accessed December 2006.
3. Weild, AR, et al. Prevalence of HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C antibodies in prisoners in England and Wales: a National Survey. Communicable Disease and Public Health 2000; 3: 121126.
4. Sutton, AJ, et al. Modelling the hepatitis B vaccination programme in prisons. Epidemiology and Infection 2006; 134: 231242.
5. Gore, SM, et al. Anonymous HIV surveillance with risk-factor elicitation: at Perth (for men) and Cornton Vale (for women) prisons in Scotland. International Journal of STD & AIDS 1997; 3: 166175.
6. Allwright, S, et al. Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV and risk factors in Irish prisoners: results of a national cross sectional survey. British Medical Journal 2000; 321: 7882.
7. Vong, S, et al. Vaccination in the county jail as a strategy to reach high risk adults during a community-based hepatitis a outbreak among methamphetamine drug users. Vaccine 2005; 23: 10211028.
8. Gilbert, RL, et al. Hepatitis A vaccination – a prison-based solution for a community-based outbreak? Communicable Disease and Public Health 2004; 7: 289293.
9. Gilbert, RL, et al. Increasing hepatitis B vaccine coverage in prisons in England and Wales. Communicable Disease and Public Health 2004; 7: 306311.
10. Hutchinson, SJ, et al. Sudden rise in uptake of hepatitis B vaccination among injecting drug users associated with a universal vaccine programme in prisons. Vaccine 2004; 23: 210214.
11. Sutton, AJ, Gay, NJ, Edmunds, WJ. Modelling the impact of prison vaccination on hepatitis B transmission within the injecting drug user population of England and Wales. Vaccine 2006; 24: 23772386.
12. Weinbaum, CM, Sabin, KM, Santibanez, SS. Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV in correctional populations: a review of epidemiology and prevention. AIDS 2005; 19 (Suppl. 3): S41S46.
13. Bird, AG, et al. Anonymous HIV surveillance with risk factor elicitation at Scotland's largest prison, Barlinnie. AIDS 1995; 9: 801808.
14. Sutton, AJ, et al. Modelling the force of infection for hepatitis B and hepatitis C in injecting drug users in England and Wales. BMC Infectious Diseases 2006; 6: 93.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed