Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-5sfl8 Total loading time: 0.246 Render date: 2022-12-03T10:21:48.729Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Molecular epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori: separation of H. pylori from East Asian and non-Asian countries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2000

Y. YAMAOKA
Affiliation:
VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
M. S. OSATO
Affiliation:
VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
A. R. SEPULVEDA
Affiliation:
VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
O. GUTIERREZ
Affiliation:
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia
N. FIGURA
Affiliation:
Institute of Internal Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
J. G. KIM
Affiliation:
Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
T. KODAMA
Affiliation:
Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
K. KASHIMA
Affiliation:
Third Department of Internal Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
D. Y. GRAHAM
Affiliation:
VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

The predominant H. pylori strain circulating among geographic locations differs with regard to the genomic structure. This study determined whether structural subtypes of the cagA 3′ repeat region could be used to identify the population of origin of H. pylori isolates. We examined 600 cagA-positive H. pylori (Colombia, 100; USA, 100; France, 100; Canada, 20; Italy, 20; Korea, 100; Japan, 100; Hong Kong, 20; Taiwan, 20; Vietnam, 20). The cagA 3′ region was amplified by PCR using primers specific to Japanese and Western 3′ cagA gene sequences. PCR using Japanese cagA primers resulted in PCR products in 99·6% of strains from East Asia but no non-Asian strains. Conversely, PCR using Western cagA primers resulted in amplicons in 100% of non-Asian strains, and only one from East Asia. cagA genotyping is useful for molecular epidemiological studies as strains can be completely separated by differences in the cagA 3′ region.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press
You have Access
84
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Molecular epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori: separation of H. pylori from East Asian and non-Asian countries
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Molecular epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori: separation of H. pylori from East Asian and non-Asian countries
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Molecular epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori: separation of H. pylori from East Asian and non-Asian countries
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *