Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-fpcrz Total loading time: 0.289 Render date: 2022-06-26T12:05:21.194Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

The molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in inner London

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 April 2002

A. C. HAYWARD
Affiliation:
PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre – London/University College London, Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London
S. GOSS
Affiliation:
PHLS Mycobacterium Reference Unit, Dulwich, London
F. DROBNIEWSKI
Affiliation:
PHLS Mycobacterium Reference Unit, Dulwich, London
N. SAUNDERS
Affiliation:
PHLS Virus Reference Division, Central Public Health Laboratories, London
R. J. SHAW
Affiliation:
Director of Medicine and Professor of Respiratory Medicine, Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust, London
M. GOYAL
Affiliation:
Department of Respiratory Medicine, NHLI, ICSM London
A. SWAN
Affiliation:
PHLS Statistics Unit, London
A. UTTLEY
Affiliation:
PHLS Mycobacterium Reference Unit, Dulwich, London
A. POZNIAK
Affiliation:
Department of GUM/HIV Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London
J. GRACE-PARKER
Affiliation:
PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London
J. M. WATSON
Affiliation:
PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

The study used DNA fingerprint typing (spoligotyping and Heminested-Inverse-PCR) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from all culture-confirmed inner London patients over a 12-month period to describe transmission. The methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard IS6110 typing and by examining its ability to identify known household clusters of cases. Isolates sharing indistinguishable typing patterns using both techniques were defined as clustered. Clusters were investigated to identify epidemiological links. The methodology showed good discriminatory power and identified known household clusters of cases. Of 694 culture-confirmed cases, 563 (81%) were typed. Eleven (2%) were due to laboratory cross-contamination and were excluded. Of the remaining 552 isolates 148 (27%) were clustered. Multivariate analysis indicated that clustering was more common in those with pulmonary smear positive disease (P<0·02); those born in the United Kingdom (P<0·0003) and in patients living in south London (P = 0·02). There was also a trend towards clustering being more common in those not known to have HIV infection (P = 0·051). The results suggest that in inner London, recent local transmission makes an important contribution to notification rates.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press
You have Access
12
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in inner London
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in inner London
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in inner London
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *