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Risk factors for infection with Campylobacter jejuni flaA genotypes

  • L. E. UNICOMB (a1) (a2), L. C. O'REILLY (a3), M. D. KIRK (a4), R. J. STAFFORD (a5), H. V. SMITH (a6), N. G. BECKER (a2), M. S. PATEL (a2) and G. L. GILBERT (a7)...
Summary

We aimed to explore Campylobacter genotype-specific risk factors in Australia. Isolates collected prospectively from cases recruited into a case-control study were genotyped using flaA restriction fragment-length polymorphism typing (flaA genotyping). Exposure information for cases and controls was collected by telephone interview. Risk factors were examined for major flaA genotypes using logistic and multinomial regression. Five flaA genotypes accounted for 325 of 590 (55%) cases – flaA-6b (n=129), flaA-6 (n=70), flaA-10 (n=48), flaA-2 (n=43), flaA-131 (n=35). In Australia, infections due to flaA-10 and flaA-2 were found to be significantly associated with eating non-poultry meat (beef and ham, respectively) in both case-control and inter-genotype comparisons. All major genotypes apart from flaA-10 were associated with chicken consumption in the case-control comparisons. Based on several clinical criteria, infections due to flaA-2 were more severe than those due to other genotypes. Thus genotype analysis may reveal genotype-specific niches and differences in virulence and transmission routes.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Ms. L. E. Unicomb, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australia National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. Email: leanne.unicomb@anu.edu.au
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