Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Open access
  • Cited by 9
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Dubé, Eve and MacDonald, Noni E. 2016. The Vaccine Book.


    Bar-Tal, Yoram and Barnoy, Sivia 2016. Factors influencing the decision to comply with nurse recommendations to take or avoid influenza vaccination. Nursing Inquiry,


    While, Alison E. 2014. Are nurses fit for their public health role?. International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 51, Issue. 9, p. 1191.


    MacDonald, Noni E. and Dubé, Eve 2015. Unpacking Vaccine Hesitancy Among Healthcare Providers. EBioMedicine, Vol. 2, Issue. 8, p. 792.


    Afonso, Nelia Kavanagh, Maurice and Swanberg, Stephanie 2014. Improvement in attitudes toward influenza vaccination in medical students following an integrated curricular intervention. Vaccine, Vol. 32, Issue. 4, p. 502.


    Liao, Chung-Min and You, Shu-Han 2014. Assessing risk perception and behavioral responses to influenza epidemics: linking information theory to probabilistic risk modeling. Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment, Vol. 28, Issue. 2, p. 189.


    Assaf, Areej M. Hammad, Eman A. and Haddadin, Randa N. 2016. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rates, Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Jordan: A Comprehensive Study. Viral Immunology,


    Haviari, Skerdi Bénet, Thomas Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra André, Philippe Loulergue, Pierre and Vanhems, Philippe 2015. Vaccination of healthcare workers: A review. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, Vol. 11, Issue. 11, p. 2522.


    Lehmann, B.A. Ruiter, R.A.C. van Dam, D. Wicker, S. and Kok, G. 2015. Sociocognitive predictors of the intention of healthcare workers to receive the influenza vaccine in Belgian, Dutch and German hospital settings. Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 89, Issue. 3, p. 202.


    ×

Seasonal influenza vaccination knowledge, risk perception, health beliefs and vaccination behaviours of nurses

  • J. ZHANG (a1), A. E. WHILE (a2) and I. J. NORMAN (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268811002214
  • Published online: 18 November 2011
Abstract
SUMMARY

The relationship between knowledge, risk perceptions, health belief towards seasonal influenza and vaccination and the vaccination behaviours of nurses was explored. Qualified nurses attending continuing professional education courses at a large London university between 18 April and 18 October 2010 were surveyed (522/672; response rate 77·7%). Of these, 82·6% worked in hospitals; 37·0% reported receiving seasonal influenza vaccination in the previous season and 44·9% reported never being vaccinated during the last 5 years. All respondents were categorized using two-step cluster analyses into never, occasionally, and continuously vaccinated groups. Nurses vaccinated the season before had higher scores of knowledge and risk perception compared to the unvaccinated (P<0·001). Nurses never vaccinated had the lowest scores of knowledge and risk perception compared to other groups (P<0·001). Nurses' seasonal influenza vaccination behaviours are complex. Knowledge and risk perception predict uptake of vaccination in nurses.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Seasonal influenza vaccination knowledge, risk perception, health beliefs and vaccination behaviours of nurses
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Seasonal influenza vaccination knowledge, risk perception, health beliefs and vaccination behaviours of nurses
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Seasonal influenza vaccination knowledge, risk perception, health beliefs and vaccination behaviours of nurses
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/>. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Professor A. E. While, King's College London, 57 Waterloo Road, London SE1 8WA, UK. (Email: alison.while@kcl.ac.uk)
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


3.M Nuño , G Chowell , AB Gumel . Assessing the role of basic control measures, antivirals and vaccine in curtailing pandemic influenza: scenarios for the US, UK and the Netherlands. Journal of the Royal Society Interface 2007; 4: 505521.

4.WF Carman , Effects of influenza vaccination of health-care workers on mortality of elderly people in long-term care: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2000; 355: 9397.

5.AC Hayward , Effectiveness of an influenza vaccine programme for care home staff to prevent death, morbidity, and health service use among residents: cluster randomised controlled trial. British Medical Journal 2006; 333: 1241.

6. TLundstrom , Organizational and environmental factors that affect worker health and safety and patient outcomes. American Journal of Infection Control 2002; 30: 93–106.

7.JA Wilde , Effectiveness of influenza vaccine in health care professionals: a randomized trial. Journal of the American Medical Association 1999; 281: 908913.

10.M Straetemans , Prioritization strategies for pandemic influenza vaccine in 27 countries of the European Union and the Global Health Security Action Group: a review. BMC Public Health 2007; 7: 236.

12.PR Blank , M Schwenkglenks , TD Szucs . Influenza vaccination coverage rates in five European countries during season 2006/07 and trends over six consecutive seasons. BMC Public Health 2008; 8: 272.

13.ZH Abramson , O Levi . Influenza vaccination among primary healthcare workers. Vaccine 2008; 26: 24822489.

14.HC Maltezou , Influenza vaccination acceptance among health-care workers: a nationwide survey. Vaccine 2008; 26: 14081410.

16.G Livni , Attitudes, knowledge and factors related to acceptance of influenza vaccine by pediatric healthcare workers. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2008; 3: 111117.


18.S Shahrabani , U Benzion , GY Din . Factors affecting nurses' decision to get the flu vaccine. European Journal of Health Economics 2009; 10: 227231.

19.FW O'Reilly , GW Cran , AB Stevens . Factors affecting influenza vaccine uptake among health care workers. Occupational Medicine 2005; 55: 474479.

21.JR de Juanes , Influenza vaccination coverage among hospital personnel over three consecutive vaccination campaigns (2001–2002 to 2003–2004). Vaccine 2007; 25: 201204.


23.SP Norton , Influenza vaccination in paediatric nurses: cross-sectional study of coverage, refusal, and factors in acceptance. Vaccine 2008; 26: 29422948.



27.C Chalmers . Understanding healthcare worker uptake of influenza vaccination: a survey. British Journal of Infection Control 2006; 7: 1217.

31.B Nerlich , C Halliday . Avian flu: the creation of expectations in the interplay between science and the media. Sociology of Health and Illness 2007; 29: 4665.

32.KA Wallston , BS Wallston , R DeVellis . Development of the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scales. Health Education Monographs 1978; 6: 160170.

33. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Policy statement – recommendation for mandatory influenza immunization of all health care personnel. Pediatrics 2010; 126: 809815.


35.AM Stewart . Mandatory vaccination of health care workers. New England Journal of Medicine 2009; 361: 20152017.

36.JJM van Deldena , The ethics of mandatory vaccination against influenza for health care workers. Vaccine 2008; 26: 55625566.

37.AR Converso . Point counterpoint: mandatory flu vaccination for health care workers. American Journal of Nursing 2010; 110: 27.

38.I Looijmans-van den Akker , Beliefs on mandatory influenza vaccination of health care workers in nursing homes: a questionnaire study from the Netherlands. Journal of American Geriatrics Society 2009; 57: 22532256.

39.RK Zimmerman , Sensitivity and specificity of patient self-report of influenza and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccinations among elderly outpatients in diverse patient care strata. Vaccine 2003; 21: 14861491.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: