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The seasonality of human cryptosporidiosis in New Zealand

  • I. R. LAKE (a1), J. PEARCE (a2) and M. SAVILL (a3)
Summary

In New Zealand human cryptosporidiosis demonstrates spring and autumn peaks of incidence with the spring peak being three times greater in magnitude than the autumn peak. The imbalance between the two peaks is notable, and may be associated with the high livestock density in New Zealand. In the summer and autumn the cryptosporidiosis rate was positively associated with temperatures in the current and previous month, highlighting the importance of outdoor recreation to transmission. No associations between spring incidence and weather were found providing little support for the importance of drinking-water pathways. Imported travel cases do not appear to be an important factor in the aetiology of cryptosporidiosis in New Zealand.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence: Dr I. R. Lake, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. (Email: i.lake@uea.ac.uk)
References
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1. Learmonth, JJ, et al. Genetic characterization and transmission cycles of Cryptosporidium species isolated from humans in New Zealand. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 2004; 70: 39733978.
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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
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