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A severe and explosive outbreak of hepatitis B in a rural population in Sirsa district, Haryana, India: unnecessary therapeutic injections were a major risk factor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2001

J. SINGH
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
S. GUPTA
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
S. KHARE
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
R. BHATIA
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
D. C. JAIN
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
J. SOKHEY
Affiliation:
National Institute of Communicable Diseases, 22 Shamnath Marg, Delhi-110054, India
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Abstract

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Most outbreaks of viral hepatitis in India are caused by hepatitis E. This report describes an outbreak of hepatitis B in a rural population in Haryana state in 1997. At least 54 cases of jaundice occurred in Dhottar village (population 3096) during a period of 8 months; 18 (33·3%) of them died. Virtually all fatal cases were adults and tested positive for HBsAg (other markers not done). About 88% (21/24) of surviving cases had acute or persistent HBV/HCV infections; 54% (13/24) had acute hepatitis B. Many other villages reported sporadic cases and deaths. Data were pooled from these villages for analysis of risk factors. Acute hepatitis B cases had received injections before illness more frequently (11/19) than those found negative for acute or persistent HBV/HCV infections (3/17) (P = 0·01). Although a few cases had other risk factors, these were equally prevalent in two groups. The results linked the outbreak to the use of unnecessary therapeutic injections.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2000 Cambridge University Press
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A severe and explosive outbreak of hepatitis B in a rural population in Sirsa district, Haryana, India: unnecessary therapeutic injections were a major risk factor
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A severe and explosive outbreak of hepatitis B in a rural population in Sirsa district, Haryana, India: unnecessary therapeutic injections were a major risk factor
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