Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR): weather and incidence in Illinois

  • J. L. KERINS (a1), S. DOREVITCH (a1) and M. S. DWORKIN (a1)

Summary

The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of increasing incidence of Spotted Fever Group rickettsioses (SFGR) in Illinois, with a specific focus on weather variables. We analysed cases of SFGR reported to the Illinois Department of Public Health from 2004 to 2013. Surveillance definitions changed in 2008 and 2010, but those changes alone did not account for observed spikes in incidence in 2008, 2012 and 2013. A total of 590 cases of SFGR occurred, with the majority in the southernmost portion of the state. Only 3·4% of the reported cases were considered confirmed under the case definition. Increased mean winter temperature (IRR 1·32, CI 1·25–1·40) and increased precipitation (IRR 1·08, CI 1·04–1·11) were each associated with increased incidence of SFGR. Our findings show that weather appears to play a significant role in explaining the increasing annual incidence of SFGR in Illinois.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR): weather and incidence in Illinois
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR): weather and incidence in Illinois
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR): weather and incidence in Illinois
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: J. Kerins, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. (Email: janna.kerins@cityofchicago.org)

Footnotes

Hide All

These authors were co-principal investigators

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1. Drexler, NA, et al. National Surveillance of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses in the United States, 2008–2012. American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 2016; 94: 2634.
2. Biggs, HM, et al. Diagnosis and management of Tickborne Rickettsial Diseases: Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other Spotted Fever Group rickettsioses, Ehrlichioses, and Anaplasmosis – United States. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports 2016; 65(2): 144.
3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System: Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) (Rickettsia rickettsii). 2015 (http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever). Accessed 18 December 2015.
4. Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). Revision of the Surveillance Case Definition for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. CSTE position statement 07-ID-05 (http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.cste.org/resource/resmgr/PS/07-ID-05.pdf). CSTE, 2007.
5. Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). Public Health Reporting and National Notification for Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis (Including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever). CSTE position statement 09-ID-16 (http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.cste.org/resource/resmgr/PS/09-ID-16.pdf). CSTE, 2009.
6. Jones, CG, Kitron, UD. Populations of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) are modulated by drought at a Lyme disease focus in Illinois. Journal of Medical Entomology 2000; 37: 408415.
7. McEnroe, WD. Adaptions in the life cycle of Dermacentor variabilis (Say) and Ixodes dammini (Spielman, Clifford, Piesman, and Corwin) marginal populations (Acari: Ixodidae). Experimental & Applied Acarology 1985; 1: 179184.
8. Rynkiewicz, EC, Clay, K. Tick community composition in Midwestern US habitats in relation to sampling method and environmental conditions. Experimental & Applied Acarology 2014; 64: 109119.
9. Hahn, MB, et al. Modeling the geographic distribution of Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the contiguous United States. Journal of Medical Entomology 2016; 53(5): 11761191.
10. Hermann, JA, et al. Temporal and spatial distribution of tick-borne disease cases among humans and Canines in Illinois (2000–2009). Environmental Health Insights 2014; 8(Suppl. 2): 1527.
11. Gubler, DJ, et al. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on vector-borne and rodent-borne. Environmental Health Perspectives 2001; 109(Suppl. 2): 223233.
12. Garvie, MB, et al. Seasonal dynamics of American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say), populations in southwestern Nova Scotia. Canadian Journal of Zoology 1978; 56: 2839.
13. Stein, KJ, et al. The effects of vegetation density and habitat disturbance on the spatial distribution of ixodid ticks (Acari: ixodidae. Geospatial Health 2008; 2(2): 241252.
14. Kaplan, JE, Newhouse, VF. Occurrence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in relation to climatic, geophysical and ecologic variables. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 1984; 33: 12811282.
15. Moore, SM, et al. Meteorological influences on the seasonality of Lyme disease in the United States. American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 2014; 90(3): 486496.
16. Monaghan, AJ, et al. Climate change influences on the annual onset of Lyme disease in the United States. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 2015; 6(5): 615622.
17. Subak, S. Effects of climate on variability in Lyme disease incidence in the Northeastern United States. American Journal of Epidemiology 2003; 157: 531538.
18. Dahlgren, FS, et al. Expanding range of Amblyomma americanum and simultaneous changes in the epidemiology of spotted fever group Rickettsiosis in the United States. American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 2016; 94: 3542.
19. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: National Centers for Environmental Information. U.S. Climate Divisions. 2015 (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/monitoring-references/maps/us-climate-divisions.php). Accessed 14 April 2015.
20. U.S. Census Bureau. Population Estimates: Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: 1 April 2010 to 1 July 2013. 2014 (https://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/totals/2013/CO-EST2013-01.html). Accessed 2 April 2015.
21. U.S. Census Bureau. Population Estimates: Intercesal Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: 1 April 2000 to 1 July 2010. 2012 (http://www.census.gov/popest/data/intercensal/county/CO-EST00INT-01.html). Accessed 2 April 2015.
22. Prairie Research Institute: Illinois State Water Survey. Illinois State Climatologist Data. 2015 (http://www.isws.illinois.edu/data/climatedb/dataex.asp). Accessed 2 January 2015.
23. Openshaw, JJ, et al. Rocky mountain spotted fever in the United States, 2000–2007: interpreting contemporary increases in incidence. American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene 2010; 83: 174182.
24. Illinois Department of Public Health. News release: state public health director warns of increased reports of Rocky Mountain spotted fever after a recent death. 2008 (http://www.idph.state.il.us/public/press08/8.21.08RockyMtn.htm). Accessed 9 November 2015.
25. Burg, JG. Seasonal activity and spatial distribution of host-seeking adults of the tick Dermacentor variabilis . Medical and Veterinary Entomology 2001; 15: 413421.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
  • URL: /core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed