Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

ST22 and ST239 MRSA duopoly in Singaporean hospitals: 2006–2010

  • J. TEO (a1), T. Y. TAN (a2), P. Y. HON (a3), W. LEE (a1), T. H. KOH (a4), P. KRISHNAN (a5), L. Y. HSU (a3) and the Network for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Singapore)...

Summary

Surveillance is integral for the monitoring and control of infectious diseases. We conducted prospective laboratory surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in five Singaporean public-sector hospitals from 2006 to 2010, using WHONET 5.6 for data compilation and analysis. Molecular profiling using multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec classification and multilocus sequence typing was performed for a random selection of isolates. Our results showed overall stable rates of infection and bacteraemia, although there was significant variance among the individual hospitals, with MRSA rates increasing in two smaller hospitals and showing a trend towards decreasing in the two largest hospitals. The proportion of blood isolates that are EMRSA-15 (ST22-IV) continued to increase over time, slowly replacing the multi-resistant ST239-III. A new MRSA clone – ST45-IV – is now responsible for a small subset of hospital infections locally. More effort is required in Singaporean hospitals in order to reduce the rates of MRSA infection significantly.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      ST22 and ST239 MRSA duopoly in Singaporean hospitals: 2006–2010
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      ST22 and ST239 MRSA duopoly in Singaporean hospitals: 2006–2010
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      ST22 and ST239 MRSA duopoly in Singaporean hospitals: 2006–2010
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: L.-Y. Hsu, Department of Medicine, National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block Level 10, Singapore 119228, Singapore. (Email: liyang_hsu@yahoo.com)

References

Hide All
1.Gould, IM, et al. Cost of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its control. Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2010; 16: 17211728.
2.Monecke, S, et al. A field guide to pandemic, epidemic and sporadic clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PLoS One 2011; 6: e17936.
3.Hsu, LY, et al. Evolving EMRSA-15 epidemic in Singapore hospitals. Journal of Medical Microbiology 2007; 56: 376379.
4.Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Analysis and presentation of cumulative susceptibility test data. Wayne, PA, USA: CLSI, 2010. Approved guideline, 2nd edn, CLSI document M39-A2, vol. 25, no. 28.
5.Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Wayne, PA, USA: CLSI, 2006. CLSI supplement M100-S14, vol. 24, no. 1.
6.François, P, et al. Use of an automated multiple-locus, variable-number tandem repeat-based method for rapid and high-throughput genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2005; 43: 33463355.
7.Enright, MC, et al. Multilocus sequence typing for characterization of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible clones of Staphylococcus aureus. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2000; 38: 10081015.
8.Milheiriço, C, Oliveira, DC, de Lencastre, H. Update to the multiplex PCR strategy for assignment of mec element types in Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 2007; 51: 33743377.
9.United Kingdom Health Protection Agency. Summary points on methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia. (http://www.hpa.org.uk/web/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1278944283762). Accessed 4 September 2011.
10.Ho, PL, et al. Changes in the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with spread of the ST45 lineage in Hong Kong. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease 2009; 64: 131137.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed