Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-kwsbc Total loading time: 0.339 Render date: 2022-10-06T07:32:19.098Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Performativity in Action: How Risk Communication Interacts in Risk Regulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Extract

Examples abound of highly politicized instances of risk controversies, such as the climate debate, counterterrorism, and the commercialization of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Numerous reasons, such as divergent perspectives, ways of communication, and interests, explain why involved actors often find themselves locked in a controversy.

For instance, in the GMO debates environmental politicians, NGOs, industrial parties, consumers, and GMO scientists have exerted very distinct ways of communication, resulting in a highly polarized and contested gene-risk landscape. As a consequence, some industrial players have left or terminated R&D activities in the EU, while other scientists escape the gaze of EU-regulations and started experimenting in places with a different approach to GMO regulation and control.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 See on the bias-driven regulation in GMO communication on the example of the precautionary principle Kai Purnhagen, The Behavioural Law and Economics of the Precautionary Principle in the EU and Its Impact on Internal Market Regulation, 37 Journal of Consumer Policy, 2014, 459-460.

2 Slovic, P., Finucane, M.L., Peters, E., and MacGregor, D.G.. Risk as analysis and risk as feelings: Some thoughts about affect, reason, risk, and rationality. 24 Risk Analysis, 2004, 311322 CrossRefGoogle Scholar. See also Loewenstein, G.F., Weber, E.U., Hsee, C.K., and Welch, N.. Risk as feelings. 127 Psychological Bulletin, 2001, 267286 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed.

3 See e.g. Art. 3 No 10, Art. 6 Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 January 2002 laying down the general principles and requirements of food law, establishing the European Food Safety Authority and laying down procedures in matters of food safety OJ L 031 2002 p. 1 – 24 (General Food Law).

4 For a comprehensive overview see Aven, Terje, Misconceptions of Risk (Chichester, Wiley, 2009)Google Scholar.

5 Slovic, P.. Trust, emotion, sex, politics, and science: Surveying the risk-assessment battlefield. 19 Risk Analysis, 1999, 689701 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed.

6 P. Marijn Poortvliet and Anne Marike Lokhorst. The key role of experiential uncertainty when dealing with risks: Its relationships with demand for regulation and institutional trust. Risk Analysis (in press).

7 For an example in the context of GMO risks see Mulder, B.C., Poortvliet, P.M., Lugtig, P., and de Bruin, M.. Explaining end-users' intentions to use innovative medical and food biotechnology products. 9 Biotechnology Journal, 2014, 997999 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed.

8 See on this point Micklitz and Tridimas.

9 Van Assche, Kristof, Beunen, Raoul, and Duineveld, Martijn, Evolutionary Governance Theory: An Introduction (Heidelberg, Springer, 2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

10 Bialasiewicz, L., Campbell, D., Elden, S., Graham, S., Jeffrey, A., and Williams, A.J., “Performing Security: The Imaginative Geographies of Current US Strategy”, 26 Political Geography (2007), 405422 CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

11 Austin, J.L., How to Do Things with Words (London, Clarendon Press, 1962)Google Scholar.

12 Ibid.

13 Mackenzie, D., Muniesa, F., and Siu, L. (eds.), Do Economists Make Markets? On the Performativity of Economics (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2007)Google Scholar.

14 Bourdieu, P., Language and Symbolic Power (Cambridge, Polity, 1991)Google Scholar.

15 Butler, J., Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative (New York, Routledge, 1997)Google Scholar.

16 Assche, Kristof Van, Beunen, Raoul, and Duineveld, Martijn, “Performing Failure and Success: Dutch Planning Experiences”, 90 Public Administration (2012), 567581 CrossRefGoogle Scholar. See also Assche, Kristof Van, Beunen, Raoul, and Duineveld, Martijn, Evolutionary Governance Theory: An Introduction (Heidelberg, Springer, 2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

17 Butler, J., Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative (New York, Routledge, 1997)Google Scholar. See also Mackenzie, D., Muniesa, F., and Siu, L. (eds.), Do Economists Make Markets? On the Performativity of Economics (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2007)Google Scholar.

18 Kasperson, R.E., Renn, O., Slovic, P., Brown, H.S., Emel, J., Goble, R., Kasperson, J.X., and Ratick, S.. The social amplification of risk: A conceptual framework. 8 Risk Analysis, 1988, 177187 CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Performativity in Action: How Risk Communication Interacts in Risk Regulation
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Performativity in Action: How Risk Communication Interacts in Risk Regulation
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Performativity in Action: How Risk Communication Interacts in Risk Regulation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *