Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-phmbd Total loading time: 0.285 Render date: 2022-07-06T11:27:35.723Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Anxiety and procrastination in distance learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2021

D. Boyarinov*
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
Y. Novikova
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
L. Gubaidulina
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
F. Sultanova
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
A. Kachina
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
V. Barabanshchikova
Affiliation:
Faculty Of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russian Federation
*
*Corresponding author.

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.
Introduction

In the context of distance learning students have an increase in the level of stress, anxiety (Husky, Kovess-Masfety, Swendsen, 2020). There is also a problem with time management and, as a result, procrastination. The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project №20-04-60174.

Objectives

To study the differences in the level of anxiety and procrastination depending on the type of learning.

Methods

A total of 290 students took part in the study. In the first study (before distance), 168 people took part, the average age was 19.8. In the second study (during distance) – 120 students, the average age was 19.2. The questionnaires: General Procrastination Scale, C.Lay; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Ch.Spielberger.

Results

In the course of descriptive statistics, it was revealed that the level of procrastination and state anxiety have a middle score. However, the level of trait anxiety in conditions of distance learning is high, especially among 1st-year students. In a comparative analysis of the two studies, it turned out that the level of state anxiety is significantly higher (t=1,975;p=0,049) in conditions of distance learning. The correlation analysis revealed the relationship between procrastination and trait anxiety (r=0,414;p=0,0001).

Conclusions

These results can be used to create programs to optimize the stress manifestation in students, especially when taking online exams. The high anxiety of 1st-year students may be associated with their accumulated stress factors, such as uncertainty about the future and etc. It should be noted that the level of procrastination does not differ, which may indicate procrastination as a personality trait.

Type
Abstract
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the European Psychiatric Association
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
You have Access Open access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Anxiety and procrastination in distance learning
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Anxiety and procrastination in distance learning
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Anxiety and procrastination in distance learning
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *