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Here to Stay? Populism as a New Party Type

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2008

Andrej Zaslove*
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
*

Abstract

This article addresses the sudden and somewhat unexpected rise of populist parties in West, Central, and Eastern Europe. The first section highlights the core characteristics of populism through the construction of an ideal type. Subsequently, the focus is on the opportunity structures that give rise to populism, emphasizing the end of the post-war settlement, post-industrialism, the gradual erosion of party politics, and frustrations emanating from the consolidation of liberal democracy in Central and Eastern Europe. The final section examines three distinct forms of populism, focusing on radical-right populism (parties such as the French National Front, the Austrian Freedom Party), center-right populism (Forza Italia), and left populism (the German Party of Democratic Socialism).

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Academia Europaea 2008

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References

References and Notes

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