Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-b2xwp Total loading time: 0.462 Render date: 2022-10-03T03:11:37.949Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Teaching Spanish Literature to Chinese Students in Spain in a Bilingual Environment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 April 2016

César Domínguez*
Affiliation:
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Facultade de Filoloxía, Literatura comparada, Burgo das Nacións s/nº, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain. E-mail: cesar.dominguez@usc.es

Abstract

According to a report published by the European Commission in November 2013, Spain remains the leading destination for European university students in the Erasmus exchange scheme. Both this non-domestic audience and the launch of the European Higher Education Area have caused far-reaching changes in the Spanish university system. A more recent phenomenon to be added to this scenario is the arrival of Chinese students, of whom around 100 chose the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC) in 2014–2015, a university whose first official language is not Spanish, but Galician. This new situation has serious consequences for this university, both in managerial and teaching terms. The aim of this paper is to build on the experience of Chinese students and their teachers by focusing on how Spanish literature is taught and learned at the USC. Managerial aspects will be discussed within the context of current corporatization of universities, and teaching aspects in relation to comparative literature as intercultural pedagogy.

Type
Tsinghua–Academia Europaea Symposium on Humanities and Social Sciences, Globalization and China
Copyright
© Academia Europaea 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References and Notes

1.Mignolo, W. D. (2003) Globalization and the geopolitics of knowledge. The role of the humanities in the corporate university. Nepantla: Views from the South, 4(1), pp. 97119.Google Scholar
2.Quijano, A. (2007) Coloniality and modernity/rationality. Trans. Sonia Therborn. Cultural Studies, 21(2-3), pp. 168178 (p. 169). Originally published 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.For the distinction between colonialism and coloniality, see the above quoted essay by Quijano.Google Scholar
4.Young, R. (1992) The idea of a Chrestomathic University. In: R. Rand (ed.), Logomachia: The Conflict of the Faculties (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press), pp. 99126.Google Scholar
5.Mignolo, W. D. (2000) The role of the humanities in the corporate university. PMLA, 115(5), pp. 12381245 (pp. 1240 and 1242, respectively).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.European Commission (2013) On the Way to Erasmus +: A Statistical Overview of the ERASMUS Programme in 2011–2012: http://ec.europa.eu/education/library/reports/erasmus1112_en.pdf.Google Scholar
7.See Ministerio de Educación (2011) Estrategia de internacionalización del sistema universitario español: http://cms.ual.es/idc/groups/public/@vic/@vinternacional/documents/documento/relintinter3.pdf.Google Scholar
8.Quoted in S. Custers (2013) Spain uses language to ‘gain ground’ in Asia. The Pie News (17 January): http://thepienews.com/news/spain-uses-language-to-gain-ground-in-asia/.Google Scholar
11.One example of some problems arising from the PATEX programme is a question posed during the session of the program’s approval by the board of trustees: if this program is so helpful to students, why is it not applied to EU students as well? It was stated that EU students do not need such regular monitoring. For the session minutes, see: http://www.usc.es/export/sites/default/gl/goberno/consellogoberno/descargas/Acta_2_5_13_xfinalxwebx.pdf.Google Scholar
12.It should be noted that Tian Xia, a Chinese student who stayed at the USC, started to work on a comparative analysis of both works and is now carrying out her PhD dissertation on this topic under the supervision of Santiago Fernández Mosquera.Google Scholar
13.For this connection, see C.Y. Hsu (2010) Planteamiento del tema celestinesco chino y Jin ping mei. Celestinesca, 34, pp. 4355.Google Scholar
14.Miner, E. (1987) Some theoretical and methodological topics for comparative literature. Poetics Today, 8(1), pp. 123140 (p. 139).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.A. Relinque Eleta (trad) (2002) Tres dramas chinos: La injusticia contra Dou E que conmovió el cielo y la tierra – El huérfano del clan de los Zhao – Historia del ala oeste (Madrid: Gredos); and A. Relinque Eleta (2010–11) El erudito de las carcajadas. 2 vols. (Barcelona: Atalanta).Google Scholar
16.Derrida, J. (1992) Mochlos; or, The conflict of the faculties. In: R. Rand (ed.), (1992) Logomachia: The Conflict of the Faculties (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press), pp. 334 (p. 31).Google Scholar
17.Derrida, J. (2001) L’Université sans condition (Paris: Galilée).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Teaching Spanish Literature to Chinese Students in Spain in a Bilingual Environment
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Teaching Spanish Literature to Chinese Students in Spain in a Bilingual Environment
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Teaching Spanish Literature to Chinese Students in Spain in a Bilingual Environment
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *