Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Creativity, Risk and the Research Impact Agenda in the United Kingdom

  • Michael Power (a1)

Abstract

This article describes the recent requirement for UK universities to account for the social and economic impact of their research, and asks whether this impact agenda may change the conduct of research itself. Three critical issues are highlighted: the epistemology of impact; the problem of quantifying qualities; and the likelihood of impact growing in significance and changing the landscape of research – so-called ‘impact creep’. Overall, the article identifies some features of the research impact agenda that pose risks to creativity and risk-taking by academics.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Creativity, Risk and the Research Impact Agenda in the United Kingdom
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Creativity, Risk and the Research Impact Agenda in the United Kingdom
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Creativity, Risk and the Research Impact Agenda in the United Kingdom
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

Hide All
1. Kuhn, T. (1970) The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Chicago: University of Chicago).
2. Narin, F., Hamilton, K. and Olivastro, D. (1997) The increasing linkage between US technology and public science. Research Policy, 26, pp. 317330.
3. Warry Report (2006) Increasing the Economic Impact of Research Councils: Advice to the Director General of Science and Innovation from the Research Council Economic Impact Group (London: BIS).
4. Power, See M. (2015) How accounting begins: object formation and the accretion of infrastructure. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 47, pp. 4355.
7. Power, M. (1996) Making things auditable. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 21(2/3), pp. 289315.
8. See Technopolis Ltd. (2010) REF Research Impact Pilot Exercise: Lessons Learned Project: Feedback on Pilot Submissions. London, November.
9. Strathern, M. (2000) The tyranny of transparency. British Education Research Journal, 26(3), pp. 309321.
10. Espeland, W. and Stevens, M. (1998) Commensuration as a social process. Annual Review of Sociology, 24, pp. 313343.
11. Greenwood, R., Raynard, M., Kodeih, F., Micelotta, E.R. and Lounsbury, M. (2011) Institutional complexity and organizational responses. The Academy of Management Annals, 5, pp. 317371.
12. Kerr, S. (1975) On the folly of rewarding A, while hoping for B. The Academy of Management Journal, 18(4), pp. 769783.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed