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Endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipid dysregulation

  • Stephen M. Colgan (a1), Ali A. Al-Hashimi (a1) and Richard C. Austin (a1)

Abstract

Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is a fundamental and highly regulated process. Transcription factors known as sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) coordinate the expression of many genes involved in the biosynthesis and uptake of cholesterol. Dysregulation of SREBP activation and cellular lipid accumulation has been associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This review will provide an overview of ER stress and the UPR as well as cholesterol homeostasis and SREBP regulation, with an emphasis on their interaction and biological relevance.

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Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Richard C. Austin, 50 Charlton Avenue East, Room T-3313, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaL8N 4A6. E-mail: austinr@taari.ca

References

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There are currently several excellent reviews that address different aspects of ER stress, UPR and lipid dysregulation:

Lee, A.H. and Glimcher, L.H. (2009) Intersection of the unfolded protein response and hepatic lipid metabolism. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 66, 2835-2850
Ferré, P. and Foufelle, F. (2010) Hepatic steatosis: a role for de novo lipogenesis and the transcription factor SREBP-1c. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 12(Suppl 2), 83-92
Marciniak, S.J. and Ron, D. (2006) Endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in disease. Physiological Reviews 86, 1133-1149
Brown, M.S. and Goldstein, J.L. (2009) Cholesterol feedback: from Schoenheimer's bottle to Scap's MELADL. Journal of Lipid Research S15-S27
Michael Conn, P. (ed.) (in press) The unfolded protein response and cellular stress. Methods in Enzymology. Academic Press.
National Institutes of Health: Office of Rare Diseases Research is a highly informative site providing information about basic information, research and clinical trials and research resources with a focus on rare human diseases:http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/
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Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine
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