Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-xt4p2 Total loading time: 0.272 Render date: 2022-05-23T11:53:55.218Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

VAGINAL MICROBIOME–PREGNANT HOST INTERACTIONS DETERMINE A SIGNIFICANT PROPORTION OF PRETERM LABOUR

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2014

MANJU CHANDIRAMANI*
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
PHILLIP R BENNETT
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
RICHARD BROWN
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
YUN S LEE
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
DAVID A. MACINTYRE*
Affiliation:
Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
*
Dr Manju Chandiramani and Dr David MacIntyre, Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London W12 ONN, United Kingdom. Email addresses: m.chandiramani@imperial.ac.uk; d.macintyre@imperial.ac.uk.
Dr Manju Chandiramani and Dr David MacIntyre, Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, London W12 ONN, United Kingdom. Email addresses: m.chandiramani@imperial.ac.uk; d.macintyre@imperial.ac.uk.

Extract

Preterm birth (PTB) has a global prevalence of 11.1% accounting for almost 15 million babies born each year before 37 weeks of gestation. It is a risk factor in over 50% of all neonatal deaths, which amounts to 1.1 million deaths annually. Preterm birth, especially at early gestational ages is associated with a high risk of long-term morbidity in survivors. Despite much research effort, PTB rates continue to rise, placing immense financial and emotional burden on society. In the US, the annual societal economic cost associated with PTB is $26.2 billion with an average of $51,600 being spent per infant born preterm. Preterm labour (PTL) accounts for 70% of these births, of which 25% are preceded by preterm pre-labour rupture of membranes (PPROM).

Type
Hypotheses
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1Blencowe, H, Cousens, S, Chou, D, Oestergaard, M, Say, L, Moller, A-B, et al.Born too soon: the global epidemiology of 15 million preterm births. Reprod Health 2013; 10: S2.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2Chang, HH, Larson, J, Blencowe, H, Spong, CY, Howson, CP, Cairns-Smith, S, et al.Preventing preterm births: analysis of trends and potential reductions with interventions in 39 countries with very high human development index. Lancet 2013; 381: 223–34.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3Born Too Soon: Global Action Report for Preterm Birth. New York: MoD, PMNCH, Save the Children, WHO, 2012.Google Scholar
5Goldenberg, RL, Culhane, JF, Romero, R. Epidemiology and causes of preterm birth. Lancet 2008; 371: 7584.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Watts, DH, Krohn, MA, Hillier, SL, Eschenbach, DA. The association of occult amniotic fluid infection with gestational age and neonatal outcome among women in preterm labor. Obstet Gynecol 1992; 79: 351–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7Romero, R, Gonzalez, R, Sepulveda, W, Brandt, F, Ramirez, M, Sorokin, Y, et al.Infection and labour. VIII. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity in patients with suspected cervical incompetence: prevalence and clinical significance. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1992; 167: 1086–91.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Goldenberg, RL, Hauth, JC, Andrews, WW. Intrauterine infection and preterm delivery. N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1500–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9Lindstrom, TM, Bennett, PR. The role of Nuclear Factor Kappa B in human labour. Reproduction 2005; 130: 569–81.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10Gotsch, F, Romero, R, Kusanovic, JP, Mazaki-Tovi, S, Pineles, B, Erez, O, et al.The fetal inflammatory response syndrome. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2007; 50: 652–83.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11Lamont, RF, Sobel, JD, Akins, RA, Hassan, SS, Chaiworapongsa, T, Kusanovic, JP, et al.The vaginal microbiome: new information about genital tract flora using molecular based techniques. BJOG 2011; 118: 533–49.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12Cunnington, M, Kortsalioudaki, C, Heath, P. Genitourinary pathogens and preterm birth. Curr Opin Infect Dis 2013; 26: 219–30.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13Breugelmans, M, Vancutsem, E, Naessens, A, Laubach, M, Foulon, W. Association of abnormal vaginal flora and Ureaplasma species as risk factors for preterm birth: a cohort species. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2010; 89: 256–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
14Nicholson, JK, Lindon, JC, Holmes, E. ‘Metabonomics’: understanding the metabolic responses of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli via multivariate statistical analysis of biological NMR spectroscopic data. Xenobiotica 1999; 29: 1181–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15Simcox, R, Sin, WT, Seed, PT, Briley, A, Shennan, AH. Prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of preterm birth in women at risk: a meta-analysis. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2007; 47: 368–77.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16Brocklehurst, P, Gordon, A, Heatley, E, Milan, SJ. Antibiotics for treating bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013; 1: CD000262.Google Scholar
17Kenyon, SL, Taylor, DJ, Tarnow-Mordi, W. Broad-spectrum antibiotics for preterm, prelabour rupture of the fetal membranes: the ORACLE I randomised trial. Lancet 2001; 357: 981–90.Google ScholarPubMed
18Kenyon, S, Pike, K, Jones, DR, Brocklehurst, P, Marlow, N, Salt, A, et al.Childhood outcomes after prescription of antibiotics to pregnant women with spontaneous preterm labour: 7-year follow-up of the ORACLE II trial. Lancet 2008; 372: 1276–8.Google ScholarPubMed
19Morency, A, Bujold, E. The effect of second-trimester antibiotic therapy on the rate of preterm birth. J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2007; 29: 3544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20Shennan, AH, Crawshaw, S, Briley, A, Hawken, J, Seed, PT, Jones, G, et al.A randomised controlled trial of metronidazole for the prevention of preterm birth in women positive for cervicovaginal fetal fibronectin: the PREMET Study. BJOG 2006; 113: 6574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
21Lamont, RF, Nhan-Chang, CL, Sobel, JD, Workowski, K, Conde-Agudelo, A, Romero, R. Treatment of abnormal vaginal flora in early pregnancy with clindamycin for the prevention of spontaneous preterm birth: a systematic review and metaanalysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2011; 205: 177–90.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
22Zhou, X, Brotman, RM, Gajer, P, Abdo, Z, Schuette, U, Ma, S, et al.Recent advances in understanding the microbiology of the female reproductive tract and the causes of premature birth. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 2010; 2010: 737425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23Ganu, RS, Ma, J, Aagard, KM. The role of microbial communities in parturition: is there evidence of association with preterm birth and perinatal morbidity and mortality? Am J Perinatol 2013; 30: 613–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24Petrosino, JF, Highlander, S, Luna, RA, Gibbs, RA, Versalovic, J. Metagenomic pyrosequencing and microbial identification. Clin Chem 2009; 55: 856–66.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25Fettweis, JM, Serrano, MG, Sheth, NU, Mayer, CM, Glascock, AL, Brooks, JP, et al.Species-level classification of the vaginal microbiome. BMC Genomics 2012; 13: S17.Google ScholarPubMed
26Jia, B, Xuan, L, Cai, K, Hu, Z, Ma, L, Wei, C. NeSSM: A next-generation sequencing simulator for metagenomics. PLoS One 2013; 8: e75448.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27Verstraelen, H, Verhelst, R, Claeys, G, De Backer, E, Temmerman, M, Vaneechoutte, M. Longitudinal analysis of the vaginal microflora in pregnancy suggests that L. crispatus promotes the stability of the normal vaginal microflora and that L. gasseri and/or L. iners are more conducive to the occurrence of abnormal vaginal microflora. BMC Microbiol 2009; 9: 116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
28Ravel, J, Gajer, P, Abdo, Z, Schneider, M, Koenig, SSK, McCulle, SL, et al.Vaginal microbiome of reproductive-age women. PNAS 2011; 108: 4680–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
29Mossop, H, Linhares, IM, Bongiovanni, AM, Ledger, WJ, Witkin, SS. Influence of lactic acid on endogenous and viral RNA-induced immune mediator production by vaginal epithelial cells. Obstet Gynecol 2011; 118: 840–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
30Witkin, SS, Mendes-Soares, H, Linhares, IM, Jayaram, A, Ledger, WJ, Forney, LJ. Influence of vaginal bacteria and D- and L-lactic acid isomers on vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer: implications for protection against upper genital tract infections. mBio 2013; 4: e0046013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
31Lindsay, KL, Walsh, CA, Brennan, L, McAuliffe, FM. Probiotics in pregnancy and maternal outcomes: a systematic review. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2013; 26: 772–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
32Othman, M, Neilson, JP, Alfirevic, Z. Probiotics for preventing preterm labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007: CD005941.Google Scholar
33Krauss-Silva, L, Moreira, ME, Alves, MB, Braga, A, Camacho, KG, Batista, MR, et al.A randomised controlled trial of probiotics for the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery associated with bacterial vaginosis: preliminary results. Trials 2011; 12: 239.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
34Vitali, B, Cruciani, F, Baldassarre, ME, Capursi, T, Spisni, E, Valerii, MC, et al.Dietary supplementation with probiotics during later pregnancy: outcome on vaginal microbiota and cytokine secretion. BMC Microbiol 2012; 12: 236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

VAGINAL MICROBIOME–PREGNANT HOST INTERACTIONS DETERMINE A SIGNIFICANT PROPORTION OF PRETERM LABOUR
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

VAGINAL MICROBIOME–PREGNANT HOST INTERACTIONS DETERMINE A SIGNIFICANT PROPORTION OF PRETERM LABOUR
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

VAGINAL MICROBIOME–PREGNANT HOST INTERACTIONS DETERMINE A SIGNIFICANT PROPORTION OF PRETERM LABOUR
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *