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The Arab Spring: One Region, Several Puzzles, and Many Explanations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 July 2015

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Review Article
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Copyright © The Author(s). Published by Government and Opposition Limited and Cambridge University Press 2015 

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Footnotes

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Sean Yom is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Temple University. Contact email: seanyom@temple.edu.

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