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Spy Fever in Britain, 1900–1915*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2009

David French
Affiliation:
King's College, London

Extract

Historians have spilt much ink in explaining the diplomatic machinations which led to war in 1914, but rather less ink in accounting for the bitterness which the war aroused. The answer to that question probably lies outside the realm of diplomatic documents. For Britain at least, a tiny part of the answer can be found in a myth which became increasingly virulent in the decade or so before the war: the myth of the evil and ubiquitous German spy.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1978

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References

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47 At least one promising file is closed until 2015.

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63 Hansard, fifth ser, LXVIII, 1369, 26 November 1914.

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71 Wilson, , Downfall, p. 51Google Scholar; The Times, 10–14 May 1915.

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