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MALTHUSIAN MOMENTS: INTRODUCTION

  • ALISON BASHFORD (a1), DUNCAN KELLY (a2) and SHAILAJA FENNELL (a2)
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Abstract

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Corresponding author

School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales, Morven Brown Building, 243, Sydney, NSW 2052a.bashford@unsw.edu.au
Centre of Development Studies, University of Cambridge, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, cb3 9dtss141@cam.ac.uk
Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, cb3 9dtdjk36@cam.ac.uk

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This special issue is based on papers given at Malthus: Food Land People, a conference held at Jesus College, Cambridge, and at the Centre for Research in Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Cambridge, in June 2016. We are grateful to CRASSH and to the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge, for their generous support of this meeting that considered the impact of a prominent Jesus student and Fellow.

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References

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1 Mayhew, Robert J., ‘Malthus's globalisms: Enlightenment geographical imaginaries and the Essay on the principle of population’, in Finnegan, Diarmid and Wright, Jonathan, eds., Spaces of global knowledge: exhibition, encounter and exchange in an age of empire (Aldershot, 2015), pp. 167–83; Mayhew, Robert J., ed., New perspectives on Malthus (Cambridge, 2016), pp. 105–27; Bashford, Alison and Chaplin, Joyce E., The new worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: re-reading the principle of population (Princeton, NJ, 2016). See also Mayhew, Robert J., Malthus: the life and legacies of an untimely prophet (Cambridge, MA, 2014). For previous anniversary publications, see Pullen, John, ‘The last sixty-five years of Malthus scholarship’, History of Political Economy, 30 (1998), pp. 343–52; Gilbert, Geoffrey, ed., Malthus: critical responses (4 vols., London, 1998); Waterman, A. M. C., ‘Reappraisal of “Malthus the economist”, 1933–1997’, History of Political Economy, 30 (1998), pp. 293334; Coleman, David and Schofield, Roger, eds., The state of population theory: forward from Malthus (Oxford, 1986).

2 Malthus, Thomas Robert. The works of Thomas Robert Malthus, ed. Wrigley, E. A. and Souden, David (8 vols., London, 1986); Pullen, J. M., ‘Introduction’, in Malthus, T. R., Principles of political economy, ed. Pullen, J. M., Variorum Edition (2 vols., Cambridge, 1989), i, pp. 1169.

3 For organic to fossil fuels, see Wrigley, E. A., Energy and the English industrial revolution (Cambridge, 2010); E. A. Wrigley, ‘Elegance and experience: Malthus at the bar of history’, in Coleman and Schofield, eds., The state of population theory, pp. 46–64.

4 Inverarity Manuscript, ch. 8, p. 30, question 10, Cambridge University Library, Marshall.c.35. Inverarity's, J. D. copy of Adam Smith, An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations (Edinburgh, 1829) holds extensive interleaved notes from Malthus's lectures, comprising questions on the text set by Malthus and his prescribed answers. See also Pullen, J. M., ‘Notes from Malthus: the Inverarity manuscript’, History of Political Economy, 13 (1981), pp. 794811.

5 Wagner-Dobler, Roland and Berg, Jan, ‘Nineteenth-century mathematics in the mirror of its literature: a quantitative approach’, Historia Mathematica, 23 (1996), pp. 288318.

6 Pal, Eszter, ‘Scientific societies in Victorian England’, Review of Sociology, 20 (2014), pp. 85111.

7 Drolet, Michael, ‘Tocqueville's interest in the social: or how statistics informed his “new science of politics”’, History of European Ideas, 31 (2005), pp. 451–71.

8 Eknoyan, Garabed, ‘Adolphe Quetelet (1796–1874) – the average man and indices and obesity’, Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation, 23 (2008), pp. 4751.

9 Chai, Andrea and Moneta, Alessio, ‘Engel curves’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 24 (2010), pp. 225–40.

10 The original paper written by Engel is quoted on p. 216 of Perthel, D., ‘Engel's law revisited’, International Statistical Review, 4 (1975), pp. 211–12.

11 MacDonald, J. Marc, ‘Malthus and the philanthropists, 1764–1865: the cultural circulation of political economy, botany and natural knowledge’, Social Sciences, 6 (2017), pp. 133.

12 Goldman, Lawrence, ‘The origins of British “social science”: political economy, natural science and statistics’, Historical Journal, 26 (1983), pp. 587616.

13 For Malthus, the slave trade, slavery, and abolition, see Bashford and Chaplin, The new worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus, ch. 6.

14 Winch, Donald, Riches and poverty: an intellectual history of political economy in Britain, 1750–1834 (Cambridge, 1996).

15 For Malthus and Christian politics, see Hilton, Boyd, The age of atonement: the influence of Evangelicalism on social and economic thought, 1785–1865 (Oxford, 1988). For recent analysis of Malthus's theology and moral philosophy, see Cremaschi, Sergio, Utilitarianism and Malthus's virtue ethics: respectable, virtuous and happy (London, 2014).

16 Nelson, Eric, The Greek tradition in republican thought (Cambridge, 206); Nelson, Eric, The Hebrew republic (Cambridge, MA, 2011), esp. pp. 138ff; Jones, Gareth Stedman, An end to poverty? (London, 2004), esp. chs. 5–6; Claeys, Gregory, Citizens and saints: politics and anti-politics in early British socialism (Cambridge, 2010); Claeys, Gregory, Machinery, money, and the millennium: from moral economy to socialism, 1815–1860 (Princeton, NJ, 1987).

17 Bashford, Alison, Global population: history, geopolitics, and life on Earth (New York, NY, 2014), ch. 1; Bashford and Chaplin, The new worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus, pp. 3–4.

18 Robertson, Thomas, The Malthusian moment: global population growth and the birth of American environmentalism (New Brunswick, NJ, 2012).

19 Ehrlich, Paul, The population bomb (Stanford, CA, 1968); Hirsch, Fred, Social limits to growth (Cambridge, MA, 1976); Connelly, Matthew, Fatal misconception: the struggle to control world population (Cambridge, MA, 2010); Bashford, Global population, chs. 10–12; Dorling, Danny, Population 10 billion (London, 2013). See also Moyn, Samuel, ‘The political origins of global justice’, in O'Brien, M., Isaac, J., Kloppenberg, J., and Ratner-Rosenhagen, J., eds., Worlds of American intellectual history (Oxford, 2017), pp. 133–54.

This special issue is based on papers given at Malthus: Food Land People, a conference held at Jesus College, Cambridge, and at the Centre for Research in Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Cambridge, in June 2016. We are grateful to CRASSH and to the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge, for their generous support of this meeting that considered the impact of a prominent Jesus student and Fellow.

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The Historical Journal
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