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Teaching South African History in the Digital Age: Collaboration, Pedagogy, and Popularizing History

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

Abstract

The digitization of African materials has made it easier than ever for students to engage with primary source documentation and undertake original research. Digitizing sources and using digital sources to teach African history has great pedagogical value, but must be done ethically. This article suggests a model for collaborative and publicly-engaged scholarship, demonstrating the potential of transnational projects and shared knowledge production while maintaining sensitivity towards questions of the hegemony of the North. The study draws on experience of a virtual internship project between North American-based university students and the South African non-profit South African History Online (SAHO).

Résumé:

Résumé:

La numérisation de documents africains a permis plus facilement que jamais aux étudiants et chercheurs d’utiliser des sources directement produites en Afrique et d’entreprendre une recherche originale. La numérisation de ces sources et leur utilisation a une grande valeur pédagogique pour enseigner l’histoire de l’Afrique, mais cette utilisation doit être effectuée de manière éthique. Cet article propose un modèle de travail scientifique collaboratif et public, démontrant le potentiel des projets transnationaux et de la production de connaissances partagées tout en conservant une sensibilité aux questions de l’hégémonie du Nord. L’étude s’appuie sur l’expérience d’un projet de stage virtuel entre des étudiants basés en Amérique du Nord et le site à but non lucratif: South African History Online (SAHO).

Type
Digital History
Copyright
© African Studies Association, 2020

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