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Article contents

Impairment and Disability: Constructing an Ethics of Care That Promotes Human Rights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2020

Abstract

The social model of disability gives us the tools not only to challenge the discrimination and prejudice we face, but also to articulate the personal experience of impairment. Recognition of difference is therefore a key part of the assertion of our common humanity and of an ethics of care that promotes our human rights.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Hypatia, Inc.

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