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Article contents

Rethinking Decolonial and Postcolonial Knowledges beyond Regions to Imagine Transnational Solidarity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 June 2020

Kiran Asher
Affiliation:
Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, University of Massachusetts, AmherstMA01003
Priti Ramamurthy
Affiliation:
Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Since the early twentieth century, various strands of “anticolonial” scholarship have been and are concerned with how colonial encounters and practices constitute differences. In recent years, this scholarship maps the uneven implications of “coloniality” for subjects and bodies marked as different, for example, “feminine,” “raced,” “queer,” or trans. Along with feminism, anticolonial scholarship's analytical goals—to link the body with body politics—are closely tied to its political ones: to correct the wrongs of colonial encounters and practices. The current avatars of anticolonial scholarship include postcolonial, decolonial, and settler-colonial variants.

Type
Musing
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Hypatia, a Nonprofit Corporation

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References

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