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Generational Differences Are Real and Useful

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2015

W. Keith Campbell
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia
Stacy M. Campbell*
Affiliation:
Department of Management and Entrepreneurship, Kennesaw State University
Lane E. Siedor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia
Jean M. Twenge
Affiliation:
San Diego State University
*
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to W. Keith Campbell, Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606. E-mail: wkeithcampbell@gmail.com

Extract

We propose that generational differences are meaningful despite some theoretical and methodological challenges (cf. Costanza & Finkelstein, 2015). We will address five main issues: operationalizing generations, measuring generational differences, theoretical models of generations, mechanisms of generational change, and the importance of science versus stereotypes.

Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2015 

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References

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