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Point-prevalence study of antimicrobial use in public hospitals in southern Sri Lanka identifies opportunities for improving prescribing practices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2018

Tianchen Sheng
Affiliation:
Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina
Gaya B. Wijayaratne
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
Thushani M. Dabrera
Affiliation:
Sri Lanka Ministry of Health, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Richard J. Drew
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Ajith Nagahawatte
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
Champica K. Bodinayake
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
Ruvini Kurukulasooriya
Affiliation:
Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
Truls Østbye
Affiliation:
Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Kristin J. Nagaro
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Cherin De Silva
Affiliation:
Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
Hasini Ranawakaarachchi
Affiliation:
Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka
A. T. Sudarshana
Affiliation:
Sri Lanka Ministry of Health, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Deverick J. Anderson
Affiliation:
Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
Christopher W. Woods
Affiliation:
Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
L. Gayani Tillekeratne*
Affiliation:
Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, North Carolina Duke-Ruhuna Collaborative Research Centre, Galle, Sri Lanka Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
*
Author for correspondence: L. Gayani Tillekeratne, 310 Trent Drive, Durham, NC 27710. E-mail: gayani.tillekeratne@duke.edu

Abstract

A point-prevalence study of antimicrobial use among inpatients at 5 public hospitals in Sri Lanka revealed that 54.6% were receiving antimicrobials: 43.1% in medical wards, 68.0% in surgical wards, and 97.6% in intensive care wards. Amoxicillin-clavulanate was most commonly used for major indications. Among patients receiving antimicrobials, 31.0% received potentially inappropriate therapy.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© 2018 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION: These data were presented at a poster session at the American Society for Microbiology Microbe 2018 conference on June 7–11, 2018, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Cite this article: Sheng T, et al. (2019). Point-prevalence study of antimicrobial use in public hospitals in southern Sri Lanka identifies opportunities for improving prescribing practices. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2019, 40, 224–227. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.321

References

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