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Risk Factors for Infectious Spondylodiscitis in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Ramzi M. Helewa
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
John M. Embil
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Department of Medical Microbiology, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Cynthia G. Boughen
Affiliation:
Clinical Support Services, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Mary Cheang
Affiliation:
Biostatistical Consulting Unit, Department of Community Health Sciences, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Michael Goytan
Affiliation:
Section of Orthopedics and Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
James M. Zacharias
Affiliation:
Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Elly Trepman
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Microbiology, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Grand Itasca Clinic and Hospital, Grand Rapids, Minnesota
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A retrospective case-control and cohort analysis of hemodialysis patients was done to identify risk factors for spondylodiscitis. These risk factors included bacteremia, receipt of blood products, invasive procedures, and establishment of vascular access. The death rate was greater for case subjects than for control subjects (odds ratio, 2.7).

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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References

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