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Tracking the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) through clinical cultures alone underestimates the spread of CRE even more than anticipated

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2019

Bruce Y. Lee
Affiliation:
Public Health Computational and Operations Research (PHICOR), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Sarah M. Bartsch
Affiliation:
Public Health Computational and Operations Research (PHICOR), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Kim F. Wong
Affiliation:
Center for Research Computing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Diane S. Kim
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA
Chenghua Cao
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA
Leslie E. Mueller
Affiliation:
Public Health Computational and Operations Research (PHICOR), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Gabrielle M. Gussin
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA
James A. McKinnell
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit (ID-CORE), Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA
Loren G. Miller
Affiliation:
Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit (ID-CORE), Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA
Susan S. Huang
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA Health Policy Research Institute, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Research Brief
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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References

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Tracking the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) through clinical cultures alone underestimates the spread of CRE even more than anticipated
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Tracking the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) through clinical cultures alone underestimates the spread of CRE even more than anticipated
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