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Eliminating Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections: A National Patient Safety Imperative

  • Sean M. Berenholtz (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Lisa H. Lubomski (a1) (a2), Kristina Weeks (a1) (a2), Christine A. Goeschel (a1) (a2) (a4), Jill A. Marsteller (a3) (a4), Julius C. Pham (a1) (a2) (a5), Melinda D. Sawyer (a6), David A. Thompson (a1) (a2), Bradford D. Winters (a1) (a2), Sara E. Cosgrove (a6), Ting Yang (a1) (a2), Thomas A. Louis (a7), Barbara Meyer Lucas (a8), Christine T. George (a8), Sam R. Watson (a8), Mariana I. Albert-Lesher (a9), Justin R. St. Andre (a9), John R. Combes (a9), Deborah Bohr (a9), Stephen C. Hines (a9), James B. Battles (a10), Peter J. Pronovost (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) and on behalf of the On the CUSP: Stop BSI programa ...

Abstract

Background.

Several studies demonstrating that central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are preventable prompted a national initiative to reduce the incidence of these infections.

Methods.

We conducted a collaborative cohort study to evaluate the impact of the national “On the CUSP: Stop BSI” program on CLABSI rates among participating adult intensive care units (ICUs). The program goal was to achieve a unit-level mean CLABSI rate of less than 1 case per 1,000 catheter-days using standardized definitions from the National Healthcare Safety Network. Multilevel Poisson regression modeling compared infection rates before, during, and up to 18 months after the intervention was implemented.

Results.

A total of 1,071 ICUs from 44 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, reporting 27,153 ICU-months and 4,454,324 catheter-days of data, were included in the analysis. The overall mean CLABSI rate significantly decreased from 1.96 cases per 1,000 catheter-days at baseline to 1.15 at 16–18 months after implementation. CLABSI rates decreased during all observation periods compared with baseline, with adjusted incidence rate ratios steadily decreasing to 0.57 (95% confidence intervals, 0.50–0.65) at 16–18 months after implementation.

Conclusion.

Coincident with the implementation of the national “On the CUSP: Stop BSI” program was a significant and sustained decrease in CLABSIs among a large and diverse cohort of ICUs, demonstrating an overall 43% decrease and suggesting the majority of ICUs in the United States can achieve additional reductions in CLABSI rates.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Armstrong Institute for Patent Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins University, 750 East Pratt Street, 15th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202 (sberenho@jhmi.edu)

Footnotes

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a.

On the CUSP: Stop BSI program members are listed at the end of the text

Footnotes

References

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Eliminating Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections: A National Patient Safety Imperative

  • Sean M. Berenholtz (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Lisa H. Lubomski (a1) (a2), Kristina Weeks (a1) (a2), Christine A. Goeschel (a1) (a2) (a4), Jill A. Marsteller (a3) (a4), Julius C. Pham (a1) (a2) (a5), Melinda D. Sawyer (a6), David A. Thompson (a1) (a2), Bradford D. Winters (a1) (a2), Sara E. Cosgrove (a6), Ting Yang (a1) (a2), Thomas A. Louis (a7), Barbara Meyer Lucas (a8), Christine T. George (a8), Sam R. Watson (a8), Mariana I. Albert-Lesher (a9), Justin R. St. Andre (a9), John R. Combes (a9), Deborah Bohr (a9), Stephen C. Hines (a9), James B. Battles (a10), Peter J. Pronovost (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4) and on behalf of the On the CUSP: Stop BSI programa ...

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