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Mucosal Barrier Injury Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infection: Results from a Field Test of a New National Healthcare Safety Network Definition

  • Isaac See (a1) (a2), Martha Iwamoto (a1), Kathy Allen-Bridson (a1), Teresa Horan (a1), Shelley S. Magill (a1) and Nicola D. Thompson (a1)...

Abstract

Objective.

To assess challenges to implementation of a new National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition, mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI).

Design.

Multicenter field test.

Setting.

Selected locations of acute care hospitals participating in NHSN central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) surveillance.

Methods.

Hospital staff augmented their CLABSI surveillance for 2 months to incorporate MBI-LCBI: a primary bloodstream infection due to a selected group of organisms in patients with either neutropenia or an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease or diarrhea. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) staff reviewed submitted data to verify whether CLABSIs met MBI-LCBI criteria and summarized the descriptive epidemiology of cases reported.

Results.

Eight cancer, 2 pediatric, and 28 general acute care hospitals including 193 inpatient units (49% oncology/bone marrow transplant [BMT], 21% adult ward, 20% adult critical care, 6% pediatric, 4% step-down) conducted field testing. Among 906 positive blood cultures reviewed, 282 CLABSIs were identified. Of the 103 CLABSIs that also met MBI-LCBI criteria, 100 (97%) were reported from oncology/BMT locations. Agreement between hospital staff and CDC classification of reported CLABSIs as meeting the MBI-LCBI definition was high (90%; k= 0.82). Most MBI-LCBIs (91%) occurred in patients meeting neutropenia criteria. Some hospitals indicated that their laboratories' methods of reporting cell counts prevented application of neutropenia criteria; revised neutropenia criteria were created using data from field testing.

Conclusions.

Hospital staff applied the MBI-LCBI definition accurately. Field testing informed modifications for the January 2013 implementation of MBI-LCBI in the NHSN.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE A-24, Atlanta, GA 30333 (isee@cdc.gov)

References

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