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The importance of being sufficiently realistic: a reply to Milan Ćirković

  • Robert Klee (a1)
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Abstract
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Corresponding author
Author for correspondence: Robert Klee, E-mail: klee@ithaca.edu
References
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Ćirković, M (2003) Resource letter: Pes-1: physical eschatology. American Journal of Physics 71(2), 122133.
Ćirković, M (2017) The reports of expunction are grossly exaggerated: a reply to Robert Klee. International Journal of Astrobiology. doi: 10.1017/S1473550417000416.
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Schröder, K and Smith, R (2008) Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited. MNRAS 386, 155163.
Zea, L, Larsen, M, Estante, F, Qvortrup, K, Moeller, R, Dias de Oliveira, S, Stodieck, L and Klaus, D (2017) Phenotypic changes exhibited by E. coli cultured in space. Frontiers in Microbiology 8, 1598.
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International Journal of Astrobiology
  • ISSN: 1473-5504
  • EISSN: 1475-3006
  • URL: /core/journals/international-journal-of-astrobiology
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