Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Judging pictures: a case study of portraits of the Chief Justices, Supreme Court of New South Wales

  • Leslie J. Moran (a1)
Abstract

This essay is about portraits: judicial portraits. It offers a case study of the interface between law and visual culture. Its object of enquiry is a collection of pictures (painted and photographic), depicting the sixteen Chief Justices of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia, from 1824 to the present day. The original paintings hang in the Banco Court, Sydney. The photographs and digital copies of all the images are on the Court’s website. Beginning with a brief review of socio-legal scholarship on the judiciary, the essay explores existing work on the visual image of the judge. In response to the limitations of that research, the paper turns to art historical scholarship to facilitate an analysis of the aesthetic and technological factors (the continuities and changes) that shape and generate the meaning of these judicial images. It explores the relevance of context upon meaning. The paper demonstrates a number of methodological approaches and reflects upon the contribution that a study of judicial pictures may make to socio-legal scholarship.

Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Katherine Biber (2007) Captive Images: Race, Crime, Photography. Abingdon: Routledge.

Costas Douzinas and Lynn Nead (eds) (1990) Law and the Image: The Authority of Art and the Aesthetics of Law. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Leslie J. Moran (2008b) ‘Judicial Bodies as Sexual Bodies: A Tale of Two Portraits’, Australian Feminist Law Journal 29: 91–108.

Robert Rosenblum (2006) ‘Portraiture: Facts Versus Fiction’ in Nicholas Grimshaw , Thomas Grenon , Henri Loyrette and Caroline Beamish (eds) Citizens and Kings: Portraits in the Age of Revolution 1760–1830. London: Royal Academy Publications, 14–24.

Austin Sarat (2004) ‘Vitality amidst Fragmentation: On the Emergence of Postrealist Law and Society Scholarship’ in Austin Sarat (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1–12.

Jessica M. Silbey (2004) ‘Judges as Film Critics: New Approaches to Filmic Evidence’, University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 37: 492–571.

Catherine Soussloff (2006) The Subject in Art: Portraiture and the Birth of the Modern. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Catherine Soussloff (2006) The Subject in Art: Portraiture and the Birth of the Modern. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Charlotte. Townsend-Gault (1988) ‘Symbolic Facades: Official Portraits in British Institutions since 1920’, Art History 11: 511–26.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

International Journal of Law in Context
  • ISSN: 1744-5523
  • EISSN: 1744-5531
  • URL: /core/journals/international-journal-of-law-in-context
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
Type Description Title
UNKNOWN
Supplementary Materials

Moran supplementary material
Moran supplementary material

 Unknown (62 KB)
62 KB
PDF
Supplementary Materials

Moran supplementary material
Moran supplementary material

 PDF (12 KB)
12 KB
PDF
Supplementary Materials

Moran supplementary material
Moran supplementary material

 PDF (1.3 MB)
1.3 MB

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 19 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 77 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th May 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.