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Returns to research and outreach for integrated pest management of western flower thrips infesting French bean and tomato in Kenya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2017

E.A. Mujuka*
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, PO Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya
H. Affognon
Affiliation:
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), BP 320, Bamako, Mali
B.W. Muriithi
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), PO Box 30772-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
S. Subramanian
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe), PO Box 30772-00100, Nairobi, Kenya
P. Irungu
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, PO Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya
J. Mburu
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Nairobi, PO Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya
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Abstract

Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is a major invasive pest that causes extensive yield losses in French bean and tomato in Kenya. Thrips management is based on the application of pesticides. In addition to increased environmental risks associated with pesticides, frequent use of these chemicals increases production costs and pesticide resistance. Furthermore, exports are restricted due to non-compliance to maximum residue levels in important consumer export markets, especially the European Union (EU). This study was conducted to estimate the potential benefits of the effectiveness of the icipe-developed strategy for control of western flower thrips before dissemination of the technology in Kenya, using the economic surplus model. We calculated the benefit–cost ratio, the Net Present Value (NPV) and the Internal Rate of Return (IRR) using Cost–Benefit Analysis (CBA). Assuming a maximum conservative adoption rate of 1% and a 10% discount rate for the base deterministic scenario, the NPV of the research was estimated at US$2.2 million, with an IRR of 23% and a BCR of 2.46. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the NPV, IRR and BCR increased at an increasing rate as adoption rates increased. However, as elasticities of supply and demand increased, the NPV, IRR and BCR increased at a decreasing rate. The findings demonstrate that farmers from developing countries can gain when they obtain access to suitable pest management innovations such as integrated pest management technologies. Consequently, investment in IPM technologies for suppression of western flower thrips should be enhanced.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © icipe 2017 

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