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Short range dispersal of western flower thrips in field-grown French beans in Kenya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 April 2017

Johnson O. Nyasani*
Affiliation:
Department of Crop Protection, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization-Embu, PO Box 27–60100, Embu, Kenya Plant Health Division, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, PO Box 30772–00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Sevgan Subramanian
Affiliation:
Plant Health Division, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, PO Box 30772–00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Benedict Orindi
Affiliation:
Plant Health Division, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, PO Box 30772–00100, Nairobi, Kenya
Hans-Michael Poehling
Affiliation:
Section Phytomedicine, Institute of Horticultural Production Systems, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Herrenhäuser Strasse 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany
Rainer Meyhöfer
Affiliation:
Section Phytomedicine, Institute of Horticultural Production Systems, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Herrenhäuser Strasse 2, 30419 Hannover, Germany
*

Abstract

The short-range diurnal dispersal pattern of adult western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in relation to spatial distribution of French beans, was determined in the field. A total of 1200 adult female F. occidentalis were released on 60 French bean plants with 20 adult thrips per plant at the central release point of 3.14 m2. Dispersal was determined in terms of the number of thrips recorded on French beans planted on concentric circles at 0.9, 1.8, 3.6, 7.2 and 14.4 m radii from a circular central release point for five days. Results indicated that there was a steady increase in the proportion of dispersing adult F. occidentalis from the first to the fourth day in the first planting season, and from the first to the third day in the second planting season. The peak hour for dispersal was 10.15 h in the first season while it was 13.15 h in the second season. Temperature and wind speed were positively associated with the dispersal activity of adult F. occidentalis. Minimal flight activity was at temperatures below 15 °C and peak flight activity was at 19 °C. The prevailing wind direction did not influence the dispersal pattern of adult F. occidentalis in both seasons. Adult F. occidentalis moved up to 7.2 m on French beans on the first day. In both seasons, the mean direction of thrips dispersal was mostly uniformly distributed (not oriented to a particular compass direction) around the central release point. The results provide an insight into developing integrated management strategies against the pest based on isolation of farm fields, management of alterative hosts around French bean fields and insecticide application.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © icipe 2017 

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