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Introduction: Historicizing Domestic Workers' Resistance and Organizing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2015

Eileen Boris
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Premilla Nadasen
Affiliation:
Barnard College

Abstract

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Type
Historicizing Domestic Labor: Resistance and Organizing
Copyright
Copyright © International Labor and Working-Class History, Inc. 2015 

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References

NOTES

1. For example, Lucy Maynard Salmon, Domestic Service, 2nd edition (New York, 1897), 1901 contained a new chapter on “Domestic Service in Europe;” Isabel Eaton, “Special Report on Negro Domestic Service in the Seventh Ward,” in ed. W.E.B. DuBois, The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study, Schocken edition (New York, [1899] 1967), 427–520.

2. For example, Faye Dudden, Serving Women: Household Service in Nineteenth-Century America (Middleton, CT, 1983); Tera Hunter, To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War (Cambridge, 1997); Elizabeth Clark-Lewis, Living In, Living Out: African American Domestics in Washington, DC, 1910–1940 (Washington, D.C., 1994); Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Making a Way out of No Way: African American Women and the Second great Migration (Jackson, MS, 2009); Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Issei Nisei, War Bride: Three Generations of Japanese American Women in Domestic Service (Philadelphia, 1986); Hasia Diner, Erin's Daughters in America: Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century (Baltimore, MD, 1983); Victoria Haskins, Matrons and Maids: Regulating Indian Domestic Service in Tucson (Tucson, 2012); Mary Romero, The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream (New York, 2011).

3. Sarti, Raffaella, “Historians, Social Scientists, Servants, and Domestic Workers: Fifty Years of Research on Domestic and Care work,” International Review of Social History, 59 (2014), 279313 CrossRefGoogle Scholar. See also, Tinsman, Heidi, “The Indispensible Services of Sisters: Considering Domestic Service in United States and Latin American Studies,” Journal of Women's History 4 (1992): 3759 CrossRefGoogle Scholar; Karen Tranberg Hansen, Distant Companions: Servants and Employers in Zambia, 1900–1985 (Ithaca, NY, 1989); Carolyn Steedman, Labours Lost: Domestic Service and the Making of Modern England (Cambridge, 2009).

4. Phyllis Palmer, Domesticity and Dirt: Housewives and Domestic Servants in the United States, 1920–1945 (Philadelphia, 1989); Raka Ray and Seemin Qayum, Cultures of Servitude: Modernity, Domesticity, and Class in India (Stanford, CA, 2009); Dirk Hoerder, Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk, and Silke Neunsinger, eds., Towards a Global History of Domestic and Caregiving Workers (Leiden, 2015); Shireen Ally, From Servants to Workers: South African Domestic Workers and the Democratic State (Ithaca, NY, 2009); Vanessa May, Unprotected Labor: Household Workers, Politics, and Middle-Class Reform in New York, 1870–1940 (Chapel Hill, NC, 2011); Eileen Boris and Jennifer Klein, Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (New York, 2012).

5. Magnus, Erna, “The Social, Economic, and Legal Conditions of Domestic Servants: I,” International Labour Review 30 (1934): 190–95Google Scholar; Magnus, Erna, “The Social, Economic, and Legal Conditions of Domestic Servants: II,” International Labour Review 30 (1934): 363–64Google Scholar; Esther Cooper [Jackson], “The Negro Woman Domestic Worker in Relation to Trade Unionism” (MA thesis, Fisk University, 1940), available from Social Science Library, Fisk University.

6. For one summary of this literature, Eileen Boris and Rhacel Parreñas, eds., Intimate Labors: Cultures, Technologies, and the Politics of Care (Stanford, CA, 2010); Rhacel Parreñas, Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration, and Domestic Work (Stanford, CA, 2001).

7. Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russel Hochschild, eds., Global Woman: Nannies, Maids and Sex Workers in the New Economy (New York, 2003); Bridget Anderson, Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics of Domestic Labour (London, 2000).

8. Albert Zack to Edith Barksdale-Sloan, February 2, 1976, Folder B1, “AFL-CIO,” Papers of the National Committee of Household Employment Papers, Bethune Archives, Washington, DC; Premilla Nadasen, Household Workers Unite: The Untold Story of African American Women Who Built A Movement (Boston, 2015).

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