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Sphere of flying: the politics of international aviation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2009

Christer Jönsson
Affiliation:
Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Lund, Sweden.
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Abstract

International civil aviation appears to be a pertinent yet largely overlooked issuearea to study in the light of recent discussions about the changing international system. In this article the evolution of the international aviation system from its inception early in this century is analyzed in terms of regime changes. Three different regime periods are delineated, and possible explanations of the observed regime changes are discussed. On the face of it, the development of international aviation seems to conform with the overall global trend toward complex interdependence. Yet it also raises a number of questions concerning interdependence that might be addressed in the study of other issue-areas. These concern the links between politico-economic issue-areas and military security, the degree of harmony or conflict associated with interdependence, and the role of states generally—and the United States in particular—under conditions of complex interdependence.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The IO Foundation 1981

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References

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32 See, e.g., Bracker, J. W. S., IATA and What It Does (Leyden: A. W. Sijthoff, 1977)Google Scholar.

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48 Good summaries of the pro and con arguments in the “deregulation” controversy are found in Cohen, M. S., “Six Myths About U.S. International Air Transportation Policy,” paper presented at ITA Think Tank on International Air Transportation, Paris, 8 06 1979Google Scholar; and Stainton, R., “Deregulation: Quo Vadis? Where Indeed!” speech at International Aviation Conference, New York, 25 05 1979Google Scholar. Mr. Cohen is CAB Chairman, and Mr. Stainton Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive of British Airways.

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